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Items: 1 to 20 of 737

1.

Cardioacrofacial dysplasia 1

Cardioacrofacial dysplasia-1 (CAFD1) is characterized by congenital cardiac defects, primarily common atrium or atrioventricular septal defect; limb anomalies, including short limbs, brachydactyly, and postaxial polydactyly; and dysmorphic facial features (Palencia-Campos et al., 2020). Genetic Heterogeneity of Cardioacrofacial Dysplasia CAFD2 (619143) is caused by mutation in the PRKACB gene (176892) on chromosome 1p31. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1777656
Concept ID:
C5436885
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 36

Mitochondrial complex I deficiency nuclear type 36 (MC1DN36) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by global developmental delay, hypotonia, and failure to thrive apparent from infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals usually do not acquire ambulation, show progressive spasticity, and have impaired intellectual development with absent speech. More variable features may include pale optic discs, poor eye contact, seizures, and congenital heart defects. Laboratory studies show increased serum lactate; metabolic acidosis may occur during stress or infection. Brain imaging shows T2-weighted abnormalities in the basal ganglia and brainstem, consistent with a clinical diagnosis of Leigh syndrome (see 256000). Patient tissue showed isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency. Death may occur in childhood (Alahmad et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex I deficiency, see 252010. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1773965
Concept ID:
C5436935
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Immunodeficiency 74, COVID-19-related, X-linked

Immunodeficiency-74 (IMD74) is an X-linked recessive specific immunologic disorder characterized by the development of severe respiratory insufficiency in response to infection with the COVID19 coronavirus, also known as SARS-CoV-2 ssRNA coronavirus. Affected individuals usually require mechanical ventilation in the ICU in order to survive. Laboratory studies show activation of the immune response and may show perturbation of some values, such as increased D-dimers and fibrinogen. In vitro functional studies of patient immune cells show impaired signaling through the TLR7 pathway, resulting in defective type I and type II interferon (IFN) responses. The patients reported to date did not have a history of immunodeficiency or chronic disease (summary by van Der Made et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1768360
Concept ID:
C5435745
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Lessel-Kreienkamp syndrome

Lessel-Kreienkamp syndrome (LESKRES) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with intellectual disability and speech and language delay apparent from infancy or early childhood. The severity of the disorder is highly variable: some patients have mildly delayed walking and mild cognitive deficits, whereas others are nonambulatory and nonverbal. Most have behavioral disorders. Additional features, including seizures, hypotonia, gait abnormalities, visual defects, cardiac defects, and nonspecific dysmorphic facial features may also be present (summary by Lessel et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1762595
Concept ID:
C5436892
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Noonan syndrome 13

Noonan syndrome-13 (NS13) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by developmental delay and impaired intellectual development of variable severity, associated with behavioral problems. Affected individuals also exhibit reduced postnatal growth and craniofacial anomalies, including ptosis, hypertelorism, low-set posteriorly rotated ears, and short webbed neck. Other features include congenital heart defects and mild skeletal defects (Motta et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Noonan syndrome, see NS1 (163950). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1761918
Concept ID:
C5436773
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 14, with or without frontotemporal dementia

Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-6 (FTDALS6) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder with highly variable manifestations. Some patients present in adulthood with progressive FTD, often classified as the 'behavioral variant,' which is characterized by reduced empathy, impulsive behavior, personality changes, and reduced verbal output. Other patients present with features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction resulting in rapidly progressive paralysis and death from respiratory failure. The pathologic hallmarks of this disease include pallor of the corticospinal tract due to loss of motor neurons (in ALS). In both ALS and FTD, there are ubiquitin-positive inclusions within surviving neurons as well as deposition of pathologic TDP43 (TARDBP; 605078) or p62 (SQSTM1; 601530) aggregates. Patients with a D395G mutation (601023.0014) have been shown to develop pathologic tau (MAPT; 157140) aggregates. Some patients with the disorder may have features of both diseases, and there is significant interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (summary by Johnson et al., 2010; Wong et al., 2018; Al-Obeidi et al., 2018; Darwich et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FTDALS, see FTDALS1 (105550). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1759760
Concept ID:
C5436279
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Autoinflammation, immune dysregulation, and eosinophilia

Autoinflammation, immune dysregulation, and eosinophilia (AIIDE) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by onset of severe atopic dermatitis and chronic gastrointestinal inflammation, mainly involving the colon, in infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals tend to have asthma and food or environmental allergies, as well as poor overall growth with short stature. Laboratory studies show increased eosinophils with normal IgE levels, as well as evidence of a hyperactive immune state, including increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. Treatment with JAK inhibitors, such as ruxolitinib and tofacitinib, results in dramatic clinical improvement (summary by Gruber et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1750270
Concept ID:
C5436572
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Immunodeficiency 72 with autoinflammation

Immunodeficiency-72 with autoinflammation (IMD72) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by onset of recurrent infections or systemic inflammation in the first year of life. Affected individuals develop bacterial and viral infections that can be severe, including bacteremia, recurrent pneumonia, and meningitis, consistent with an immunodeficiency. There is also an autoimmune and hyperinflammatory aspect to the disorder, manifest as atopy or allergies, hepatosplenomegaly, and lymphoproliferation. Immunologic workup shows variable abnormalities, including low or high Ig subsets, increased B cells, irregular T-cell activation and cytokine response, impaired immune synapse formation, and defective cellular migration. At the cellular level, these defects are related to abnormal F-actin polymerization and altered intracellular signaling (summary by Cook et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1749856
Concept ID:
C5436540
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome 3

Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome-3 (RTSC3) is characterized by craniocerebellocardiac anomalies and severe postnatal growth restriction, as well as complicated skeletal malformations, including vertebral body hypoossification, sternal aplasia, and chondrodysplasia punctata. Other features include developmental delay, ocular anomalies, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and proteinuria (Kato et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome, see RTSC1 (220210). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1744611
Concept ID:
C5436883
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Renal tubular acidosis, distal, autosomal recessive

Individuals with hereditary distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) typically present in infancy with failure to thrive, although later presentations can occur, especially in individuals with autosomal dominant SLC4A1-dRTA. Initial clinical manifestations can also include emesis, polyuria, polydipsia, constipation, diarrhea, decreased appetite, and episodes of dehydration. Electrolyte manifestations include hyperchloremic non-anion gap metabolic acidosis and hypokalemia. Renal complications of dRTA include nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, medullary cysts, and impaired renal function. Additional manifestations include bone demineralization (rickets, osteomalacia), growth deficiency, sensorineural hearing loss (in ATP6V0A4-, ATP6V1B1-, and FOXI1-dRTA), and hereditary hemolytic anemia (in some individuals with SLC4A1-dRTA). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1732975
Concept ID:
C5399980
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Cardioacrofacial dysplasia 2

Cardioacrofacial dysplasia-2 (CAFD2) is characterized by congenital cardiac defects, primarily common atrium or atrioventricular septal defect; limb anomalies, including short limbs, brachydactyly, and postaxial polydactyly; and dysmorphic facial features. Developmental delay of variable severity has also been observed (Palencia-Campos et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CAFD, see CAFD1 (619142). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1731253
Concept ID:
C5436886
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8

Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-8 (FTDALS8) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by adult-onset dementia manifest as memory impairment, executive dysfunction, and behavioral or personality changes. Some patients may develop ALS or parkinsonism. Neuropathologic studies show frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with tau (MAPT; 157140)- and TDP43 (605078)-immunoreactive inclusions (summary by Dobson-Stone et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FTDALS, see FTDALS1 (105550). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1728824
Concept ID:
C5436881
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Combined immunodeficiency, X-linked

MedGen UID:
1720670
Concept ID:
CN030319
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Respiratory papillomatosis, juvenile recurrent, congenital

Congenital juvenile respiratory papillomatosis (JRRP) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the development of recurrent growth of papillomas (warts) on respiratory epithelial cells in the upper airway, particularly the larynx. Patients present in early childhood with hoarse voice and, in severe cases, respiratory stridor due to airway obstruction. Affected individuals may also have mild dermatologic abnormalities similar to those observed in AIADK. While JRRP is a genetic disorder resulting from abnormal activation of the immune system, RRP in general is usually associated with acquired HPV infection, commonly with HPV types 6 and 11 (summary by Drutman et al., 2019). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1719353
Concept ID:
C5394112
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Autoinflammation with episodic fever and lymphadenopathy

Autoinflammation with episodic fever and lymphadenopathy (AIEFL) is an autosomal dominant immunologic disorder characterized by onset of recurrent episodes of unexplained fever beginning in early infancy. The episodes occur in a cyclic pattern with a frequency of every week or every few weeks and a duration of several days. Patients have accompanying lymphadenopathy, and some may have hepatosplenomegaly. Rash and genital ulcers are not observed. Patient serum shows increased levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL6 (147620) and TNF (191160), consistent with abnormal activation of the innate inflammatory system. Treatment with anti-IL6R (147880) antibodies may result in clinical improvement (summary by Lalaoui et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1719052
Concept ID:
C5394286
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type IIr

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2R (CDG2R) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by infantile onset of liver failure, recurrent infections due to hypogammaglobulinemia, and cutis laxa. Some patients may also have mild intellectual impairment and dysmorphic features. Laboratory studies showed defective glycosylation of serum transferrin in a type 2 pattern (summary by Rujano et al., 2017). For an overview of congenital disorders of glycosylation, see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1717186
Concept ID:
C5393313
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Mental retardation, X-linked 102

DDX3X-related neurodevelopmental disorder (DDX3X-NDD) typically occurs in females and very rarely in males. All affected individuals reported to date have developmental delay / intellectual disability (ID) ranging from mild to severe; about 50% of affected girls remain nonverbal after age five years. Hypotonia, a common finding, can be associated with feeding difficulty in infancy. Behavioral issues can include autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and hyperactivity, self-injurious behavior, poor impulse control, and aggression. Other findings can include seizures, movement disorders (dyskinesia, spasticity, abnormal gait), vision and hearing impairment, congenital heart defects, respiratory difficulties, joint laxity, and scoliosis. Neuroblastoma has been observed in three individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1715418
Concept ID:
C5393299
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Long QT syndrome 16

LQT16 Long QT syndrome-16 (LQT16) is characterized by a markedly prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval and 2:1 atrioventricular (AV) block, with onset in the perinatal period. Patients experience bradycardia or ventricular tachyarrhythmias that may result in syncope, cardiac arrest, and/or sudden death (Reed et al., 2015; Wren et al., 2019). Patients with LQT14 (616247), LQT15 (616249), or LQT16, resulting from mutation in calmodulin genes CALM1 (114180), CALM2 (114182), or CALM3, respectively, typically have a more severe phenotype, with earlier onset, profound QT prolongation, and a high predilection for cardiac arrest and sudden death, than patients with mutations in other genes (Boczek et al., 2016). CPVT6 Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia-6 (CPVT6) is characterized by childhood-onset syncopal episodes with exercise or stress. Electrocardiogram (ECG) shows a normal QT interval with a prominent U wave, and stress testing reveals premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) that may occur as bigeminy or couplets, and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (Gomez-Hurtado et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1713991
Concept ID:
C5394068
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Neurodevelopmental, jaw, eye, and digital syndrome

Neurodevelopmental, jaw, eye, and digital syndrome (NEDJED) is characterized by phenotypic diversity, with patients exhibiting a range of overlapping phenotypes. Most patients show developmental delay ranging from mild to severe, and often have behavioral disorders as well. Brain imaging shows hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, prominence of lateral ventricles, and/or white matter abnormalities. Many patients have retro- or micrognathia, but mild prognathism has also been observed. Ocular anomalies are variably present, and may be severe and complex; however, some patients show only mild myopia. Abnormalities of fingers and toes include brachydactyly, clinodactyly, syndactyly, and contractures; polydactyly is rarely seen (Holt et al., 2019). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1712714
Concept ID:
C5394477
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Intellectual developmental disorder 62

MedGen UID:
1712636
Concept ID:
C5394083
Disease or Syndrome
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