Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from BioSystems

Items: 1 to 20 of 231

1.

Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation

Capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) syndrome is characterized by the presence of multiple small (1-2 cm in diameter) capillary malformations mostly localized on the face and limbs. Some affected individuals also have associated arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and/or arteriovenous fistulas (AFVs), fast-flow vascular anomalies that typically arise in the skin, muscle, bone, spine, and brain; life-threatening complications of these lesions can include bleeding, congestive heart failure, and/or neurologic consequences. Symptoms from intracranial AVMs/AVFs appear to occur early in life. Several individuals have Parkes Weber syndrome (multiple micro-AVFs associated with a cutaneous capillary stain and excessive soft-tissue and skeletal growth of an affected limb). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1648501
Concept ID:
C4747394
Disease or Syndrome
2.

EPILEPSY, FAMILIAL ADULT MYOCLONIC, 7

MedGen UID:
1648435
Concept ID:
C4748080
Disease or Syndrome
3.

INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE, IMMUNODEFICIENCY, AND ENCEPHALOPATHY

MedGen UID:
1648434
Concept ID:
C4748708
Disease or Syndrome
4.

IMMUNODEFICIENCY 15A

Immunodeficiency 15A is an autosomal dominant primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by relatively late onset of recurrent respiratory tract infections and lymphopenia, combined with immune activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. One patient presented with inflammatory disease and possible ectodermal defect. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648385
Concept ID:
C4748694
Disease or Syndrome
5.

EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY, EARLY INFANTILE, 69

Infantile epileptic encephalopathy-69 (EIEE69) is an autosomal dominant severe neurodevelopmental encephalopathic disorder characterized by early-onset refractory seizures, hypotonia, and profoundly impaired development often associated with macrocephaly, hyperkinetic movements, and contractures. The disorder can sometimes result in early death. Some patients may have a favorable seizure response to topiramate medication (summary by Helbig et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of EIEE, see EIEE1 (308350). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648381
Concept ID:
C4748988
Disease or Syndrome
6.

BONE MARROW FAILURE SYNDROME 5

Bone marrow failure syndrome-5 (BMFS5) is a hematologic disorder characterized by infantile onset of severe red cell anemia requiring transfusion. Additional features include hypogammaglobulinemia, poor growth with microcephaly, developmental delay, and seizures (summary by Toki et al., 2018) For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of BMFS, see BMFS1 (614675). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648380
Concept ID:
C4748488
Disease or Syndrome
7.

MUCOCUTANEOUS ULCERATION, CHRONIC

MedGen UID:
1648375
Concept ID:
C4748997
Disease or Syndrome
8.

ARTHROGRYPOSIS, CLEFT PALATE, CRANIOSYNOSTOSIS, AND IMPAIRED INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT

ACCIID is characterized by arthrogryposis, cleft palate, craniosynostosis, micrognathia, short stature, and impaired intellectual development. Seizures and bony abnormalities (severe slenderness of the ribs and tubular bones and perinatal fractures) have been observed (Mizuguchi et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648372
Concept ID:
C4748872
Disease or Syndrome
9.

INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDER WITH MACROCEPHALY, SEIZURES, AND SPEECH DELAY

MedGen UID:
1648339
Concept ID:
C4748428
Disease or Syndrome
10.

SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIA 42, EARLY-ONSET, SEVERE, WITH NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DEFICITS

MedGen UID:
1648308
Concept ID:
C4748120
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Gingival fibromatosis 1

MedGen UID:
1647111
Concept ID:
C4551558
Disease or Syndrome
12.

EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY, EARLY INFANTILE, 58

EIEE58 is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by onset of refractory seizures in the first days or months of life. Affected individuals have global developmental delay with intellectual disability, usually with absent speech and inability to walk. Additional features include optic atrophy with poor or absent visual fixation, hypotonia, and spasticity (summary by Hamdan et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of EIEE, see EIEE1 (308350). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1646861
Concept ID:
C4693367
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Loeys-Dietz syndrome 1

Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1646567
Concept ID:
C4551955
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection

Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (familial TAAD) involves problems with the aorta, which is the large blood vessel that distributes blood from the heart to the rest of the body. Familial TAAD affects the upper part of the aorta, near the heart. This part of the aorta is called the thoracic aorta because it is located in the chest (thorax). Other vessels that carry blood from the heart to the rest of the body (arteries) can also be affected.In familial TAAD, the aorta can become weakened and stretched (aortic dilatation), which can lead to a bulge in the blood vessel wall (an aneurysm). Aortic dilatation may also lead to a sudden tearing of the layers in the aorta wall (aortic dissection), allowing blood to flow abnormally between the layers. These aortic abnormalities are potentially life-threatening because they can decrease blood flow to other parts of the body such as the brain or other vital organs, or cause the aorta to break open (rupture).The occurrence and timing of these aortic abnormalities vary, even within the same affected family. They can begin in childhood or not occur until late in life. Aortic dilatation is generally the first feature of familial TAAD to develop, although in some affected individuals dissection occurs with little or no aortic dilatation.Aortic aneurysms usually have no symptoms. However, depending on the size, growth rate, and location of these abnormalities, they can cause pain in the jaw, neck, chest, or back; swelling in the arms, neck, or head; difficult or painful swallowing; hoarseness; shortness of breath; wheezing; a chronic cough; or coughing up blood. Aortic dissections usually cause severe, sudden chest or back pain, and may also result in unusually pale skin (pallor), a very faint pulse, numbness or tingling (paresthesias) in one or more limbs, or paralysis.Familial TAAD may not be associated with other signs and symptoms. However, some individuals in affected families show mild features of related conditions called Marfan syndrome or Loeys-Dietz syndrome. These features include tall stature, stretch marks on the skin, an unusually large range of joint movement (joint hypermobility), and either a sunken or protruding chest. Occasionally, people with familial TAAD develop aneurysms in the brain or in the section of the aorta located in the abdomen (abdominal aorta). Some people with familial TAAD have heart abnormalities that are present from birth (congenital). Affected individuals may also have a soft out-pouching in the lower abdomen (inguinal hernia), an abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis), or a purplish skin discoloration (livedo reticularis) caused by abnormalities in the tiny blood vessels of the skin (dermal capillaries). However, these conditions are also common in the general population. Depending on the genetic cause of familial TAAD in particular families, they may have an increased risk of developing blockages in smaller arteries, which can lead to heart attack and stroke.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
1644766
Concept ID:
C4707243
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Progressive supranuclear ophthalmoplegia

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is the second most frequent cause of degenerative parkinsonism. In addition to parkinsonism, the clinical symptoms include early postural instability, supranuclear gaze palsy, and cognitive decline. Neuropathologically, the disorder is characterized by abundant neurofibrillary tangles, which differ in both distribution and composition from those associated with Alzheimer disease. In progressive supranuclear palsy, the tangles are primarily localized to subcortical regions and are found in both neurons and glia, whereas in Alzheimer disease they are more widespread, largely cortical, and limited to neurons. They also have different characteristics at the ultrastructural level (Baker et al., 1999). Kertesz (2003) suggested the term 'Pick complex' to represent the overlapping syndromes of frontotemporal dementia (FTD; 600274), primary progressive aphasia (PPA), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), progressive supranuclear palsy, and FTD with motor neuron disease. He noted that frontotemporal dementia may also be referred to as 'clinical Pick disease,' and that the term 'Pick disease' (172700) should be restricted to the pathologic finding of Pick bodies. Genetic Heterogeneity of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Other loci for PSP have been mapped to chromosome 1q31 (PSNP2; 609454) and 11p12-p11 (PSNP3; 610898). See also Parkinson-dementia syndrome and atypical progressive supranuclear palsy (260540). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1640811
Concept ID:
C4551863
Disease or Syndrome
16.

TUMORAL CALCINOSIS, HYPERPHOSPHATEMIC, FAMILIAL, 2

Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by the progressive deposition of basic calcium phosphate crystals in periarticular spaces, soft tissues, and sometimes bone (Chefetz et al., 2005). The biochemical hallmark of tumoral calcinosis is hyperphosphatemia caused by increased renal absorption of phosphate due to loss-of-function mutations in the FGF23 or GALNT3 (601756) gene. The term 'hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome' is sometimes used when the disorder is characterized by involvement of the long bones associated with the radiographic findings of periosteal reaction and cortical hyperostosis. Although some have distinguished HHS from FTC by the presence of bone involvement and the absence of skin involvement (Frishberg et al., 2005), Ichikawa et al. (2010) concluded that the 2 entities represent a continuous spectrum of the same disease, best described as familial hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis. HFTC is considered to be the clinical converse of autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR; 193100), an allelic disorder caused by gain-of-function mutations in the FGF23 gene and associated with hypophosphatemia and decreased renal phosphate absorption (Chefetz et al., 2005; Ichikawa et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HFTC, see 211900. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1640532
Concept ID:
C4693863
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Noonan syndrome 1

Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1638960
Concept ID:
C4551602
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification 1

Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC) is a neurodegenerative disorder with characteristic calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain areas visualized on neuroimaging. Most affected individuals are in good health during childhood and young adulthood and typically present in the fourth to fifth decade with a gradually progressive movement disorder and neuropsychiatric symptoms. The movement disorder first manifests as clumsiness, fatigability, unsteady gait, slow or slurred speech, dysphagia, involuntary movements, or muscle cramping. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, often the first or most prominent manifestations, range from mild difficulty with concentration and memory to changes in personality and/or behavior, to psychosis and dementia. Seizures of various types occur frequently, some individuals experience chronic headache and vertigo; urinary urgency or incontinence may be present. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1637664
Concept ID:
C4551624
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Infantile myofibromatosis 1

MedGen UID:
1632352
Concept ID:
C4551572
Disease or Syndrome
20.

MYOPATHY, CENTRONUCLEAR, 6, WITH FIBER-TYPE DISPROPORTION

CNM6 is an autosomal recessive, slowly progressive congenital myopathy with onset in infancy or early childhood. Patients may be hypotonic at birth, but all show delayed motor development and walking difficulties due to muscle weakness mainly affecting the proximal lower and upper limbs. Other features include scapular winging, scoliosis, and mildly decreased respiratory vital capacity. The phenotype and muscle biopsy abnormalities are variable, although centralized nuclei and fiber-type disproportion appear to be a common finding on muscle biopsy. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of centronuclear myopathy, see CNM1 (160150). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1627492
Concept ID:
C4540345
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center