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1.

IMMUNODEFICIENCY 15A

Immunodeficiency 15A is an autosomal dominant primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by relatively late onset of recurrent respiratory tract infections and lymphopenia, combined with immune activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. One patient presented with inflammatory disease and possible ectodermal defect. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648385
Concept ID:
C4748694
Disease or Syndrome
2.

MUCOCUTANEOUS ULCERATION, CHRONIC

MedGen UID:
1648375
Concept ID:
C4748997
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Baraitser-Winter syndrome 1

Baraitser-Winter cerebrofrontofacial (BWCFF) syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by typical craniofacial features and intellectual disability (ID) that ranges from mild (usually in those with normal brain structure) to profound (typically in those with a neuronal migration defect). Many (but not all) affected individuals have iris or retinal coloboma, sensorineural deafness, and muscle wasting resulting in a peculiar stance with kyphosis, anteverted shoulders, and slightly flexed elbows and knees. Seizures, congenital heart defects, and renal malformations also are common. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1630999
Concept ID:
CN031204
Disease or Syndrome
4.

MENTAL RETARDATION, AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT 48

MedGen UID:
1619532
Concept ID:
C4540321
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
5.

CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS AND SKELETAL MALFORMATIONS SYNDROME

Congenital heart defects and skeletal malformations syndrome (CHDSKM) is characterized by atrial and ventricular septal defects, with aortic root dilation in adulthood. Skeletal defects are variable and include pectus excavatum, scoliosis, and finger contractures, and some patient exhibit joint laxity. Failure to thrive is observed during infancy and early childhood (Wang et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1618340
Concept ID:
C4539857
Disease or Syndrome
6.

SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIA, AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE 25

MedGen UID:
1618081
Concept ID:
C4539808
Disease or Syndrome
7.

PLATELET ABNORMALITIES WITH EOSINOPHILIA AND IMMUNE-MEDIATED INFLAMMATORY DISEASE

PLTEID is an autosomal recessive immune-mediated inflammatory disease with highly variable manifestations. More severely affected individuals have recurrent infections, vasculitis, and thrombocytopenia, whereas other patients have mild vasculitis and normal numbers of small platelets without severe infections. Laboratory studies show platelets with abnormal shape, decreased dense granules, and impaired spreading ability, as well as immune dysregulation with increased eosinophils, B cells, IgA and IgE, and autoantibodies (summary by Kahr et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1618052
Concept ID:
C4540232
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Thrombocytopenia 6

Thrombocytopenia-6 is an autosomal dominant hematologic disorder characterized by increased bleeding episodes due to reduced platelet count and abnormal platelet morphology resulting from defective megakaryopoiesis. Patients may also have bone abnormalities, including osteoporosis or tooth loss, as well as an increased risk for myelofibrosis (summary by Turro et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of thrombocytopenia, see 313900. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934756
Concept ID:
C4310789
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Fanconi anemia, complementation group V

Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
934619
Concept ID:
C4310652
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Yao syndrome

Yao syndrome is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by periodic fever, dermatitis, arthritis, and swelling of the distal extremities, as well as gastrointestinal and sicca-like symptoms. The disorder is associated with specific NOD2 variants (and Shen, 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934587
Concept ID:
C4310620
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Takenouchi-Kosaki syndrome

Takenouchi-Kosaki syndrome is a highly heterogeneous autosomal dominant complex congenital developmental disorder affecting multiple organ systems. The core phenotype includes delayed psychomotor development with variable intellectual disability, dysmorphic facial features, and cardiac, genitourinary, and hematologic or lymphatic defects, including thrombocytopenia and lymphedema. Additional features may include abnormalities on brain imaging, skeletal anomalies, and recurrent infections. Some patients have a milder disease course reminiscent of Noonan syndrome (see, e.g., NS1, 163950) (summary by Martinelli et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
906646
Concept ID:
C4225222
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Immunodeficiency, common variable, 12

Common variable immunodeficiency-12 is an autosomal dominant primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections, mainly respiratory, associated with hypogammaglobulinemia. The disorder shows a highly variable age at onset and highly variable disease severity, even within the same family. Some patients have features of autoimmunity (summary by Fliegauf et al., 2015). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of common variable immunodeficiency, see CVID1 (607594). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
906018
Concept ID:
C4225277
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Seizures, cortical blindness, and microcephaly syndrome

Seizures, cortical blindness, and microcephaly syndrome (SCBMS) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by microcephaly, early-onset seizures, severely delayed psychomotor development, and cortical blindness. Affected individuals also tend to show poor overall growth with short stature (summary by Ercan-Sencicek et al., 2015). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
894797
Concept ID:
C4225261
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Immunodeficiency 15

Immunodeficiency-15B (IMD15B) is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by onset in infancy of life-threatening bacterial, fungal, and viral infections and failure to thrive. Laboratory studies show hypo- or agammaglobulinemia with relatively normal numbers of B and T cells. However, functional studies show impaired differentiation and activation of immune cells (summary by Pannicke et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
816373
Concept ID:
C3810043
15.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 18

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive disease that affects motor neurons, which are specialized nerve cells that control muscle movement. These nerve cells are found in the spinal cord and the brain. In ALS, motor neurons die (atrophy) over time, leading to muscle weakness, a loss of muscle mass, and an inability to control movement.There are many different types of ALS; these types are distinguished by their signs and symptoms and their genetic cause or lack of clear genetic association. Most people with ALS have a form of the condition that is described as sporadic, which means it occurs in people with no apparent history of the disorder in their family. People with sporadic ALS usually first develop features of the condition in their late fifties or early sixties. A small proportion of people with ALS, estimated at 5 to 10 percent, have a family history of ALS or a related condition called frontotemporal dementia (FTD), which is a progressive brain disorder that affects personality, behavior, and language. The signs and symptoms of familial ALS typically first appear in one's late forties or early fifties. Rarely, people with familial ALS develop symptoms in childhood or their teenage years. These individuals have a rare form of the disorder known as juvenile ALS.The first signs and symptoms of ALS may be so subtle that they are overlooked. The earliest symptoms include muscle twitching, cramping, stiffness, or weakness. Affected individuals may develop slurred speech (dysarthria) and, later, difficulty chewing or swallowing (dysphagia). Many people with ALS experience malnutrition because of reduced food intake due to dysphagia and an increase in their body's energy demands (metabolism) due to prolonged illness. Muscles become weaker as the disease progresses, and arms and legs begin to look thinner as muscle tissue atrophies. Individuals with ALS eventually lose muscle strength and the ability to walk. Affected individuals eventually become wheelchair-dependent and increasingly require help with personal care and other activities of daily living. Over time, muscle weakness causes affected individuals to lose the use of their hands and arms. Breathing becomes difficult because the muscles of the respiratory system weaken. Most people with ALS die from respiratory failure within 2 to 10 years after the signs and symptoms of ALS first appear; however, disease progression varies widely among affected individuals.Approximately 20 percent of individuals with ALS also develop FTD. Changes in personality and behavior may make it difficult for affected individuals to interact with others in a socially appropriate manner. Communication skills worsen as the disease progresses. It is unclear how the development of ALS and FTD are related. Individuals who develop both conditions are diagnosed as having ALS-FTD.A rare form of ALS that often runs in families is known as ALS-parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC). This disorder is characterized by the signs and symptoms of ALS, in addition to a pattern of movement abnormalities known as parkinsonism, and a progressive loss of intellectual function (dementia). Signs of parkinsonism include unusually slow movements (bradykinesia), stiffness, and tremors. Affected members of the same family can have different combinations of signs and symptoms.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
766633
Concept ID:
C3553719
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Baraitser-Winter Syndrome 2

Baraitser-Winter cerebrofrontofacial (BWCFF) syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by typical craniofacial features and intellectual disability (ID) that ranges from mild (usually in those with normal brain structure) to profound (typically in those with a neuronal migration defect). Many (but not all) affected individuals have iris or retinal coloboma, sensorineural deafness, and muscle wasting resulting in a peculiar stance with kyphosis, anteverted shoulders, and slightly flexed elbows and knees. Seizures, congenital heart defects, and renal malformations also are common. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
482865
Concept ID:
C3281235
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Anophthalmia-microphthalmia syndrome

Microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma comprise the MAC spectrum of ocular malformations. Microphthalmia refers to a globe with a total axial length that is at least two standard deviations below the mean for age. Anophthalmia refers to complete absence of the globe in the presence of ocular adnexa (eyelids, conjunctiva, and lacrimal apparatus). Coloboma refers to the ocular malformations that result from failure of closure of the optic fissure. Chorioretinal coloboma refers to coloboma of the retina and choroid. Iris coloboma causes the iris to appear keyhole-shaped. Microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma may be unilateral or bilateral; when bilateral they may occur in any combination. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
468558
Concept ID:
CN120488
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Cocoon syndrome

MedGen UID:
462241
Concept ID:
C3150891
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 15

MedGen UID:
413312
Concept ID:
C2750459
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Ectodermal dysplasia, anhidrotic, with T-cell immunodeficiency, autosomal dominant

EDAID2 is characterized by variable features of ectodermal dysplasia (e.g., hypo/anhidrosis, sparse hair, tooth anomalies) and various immunologic and infectious phenotypes of differing severity (summary by Boisson et al., 2017). Mutations in the NFKBIA gene result in functional impairment of NFKB (see 164011), a master transcription factor required for normal activation of immune responses. Interruption of NFKB signaling results in decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines and certain interferons, rendering patients susceptible to infection (McDonald et al., 2007). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ectodermal dysplasia and immune deficiency, see 300291. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
394295
Concept ID:
C2677481
Disease or Syndrome
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