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1.

Noonan syndrome 1

Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1638960
Concept ID:
C4551602
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Glycogen storage disease due to glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency type IA

Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) is characterized by accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver and kidneys resulting in hepatomegaly and nephromegaly. Severely affected infants present in the neonatal period with severe hypoglycemia due to fasting intolerance. More commonly, untreated infants present at age three to four months with hepatomegaly, severe hypoglycemia with or without seizures, lactic acidosis, hyperuricemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Affected children typically have doll-like faces with full cheeks, relatively thin extremities, short stature, and a protuberant abdomen. Xanthoma and diarrhea may be present. Impaired platelet function and development of reduced or dysfunctional von Willebrand factor can lead to a bleeding tendency with frequent epistaxis and menorrhagia in females. Individuals with untreated GSDIb are more likely to develop impaired neutrophil and monocyte function as well as chronic neutropenia resulting in recurrent bacterial infections, gingivitis, periodontitis, and genital and intestinal ulcers. Long-term complications of untreated GSDI include short stature, osteoporosis, delayed puberty, renal disease (including proximal and distal renal tubular acidosis, renal stones, and renal failure), gout, systemic hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, hepatic adenomas with potential for malignancy, pancreatitis, and polycystic ovaries. Seizures and cognitive impairment may occur in individuals with prolonged periods of hypoglycemia. Normal growth and puberty are expected in treated children. Most affected individuals live into adulthood. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
415885
Concept ID:
C2919796
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Macrothrombocytopenia and granulocyte inclusions with or without nephritis or sensorineural hearing loss

MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is characterized in all affected individuals by hematologic features present from birth consisting of platelet macrocytosis (i.e., >40% of platelets larger than 3.9 µm in diameter), thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150 x 109/L), and aggregates of the MYH9 protein in the cytoplasm of neutrophil granulocytes. Most affected individuals develop one or more additional extrahematologic manifestations of the disease over their lifetime, including sensorineural hearing loss, renal disease (manifesting initially as glomerular nephropathy), presenile cataracts, and/or elevation of liver enzymes. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1704278
Concept ID:
C5200934
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Bernard Soulier syndrome

Bernard-Soulier syndrome is an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder caused by a defect in or deficiency of the platelet membrane von Willebrand factor (VWF; 613160) receptor complex, glycoprotein Ib (GP Ib). GP Ib is composed of 4 subunits encoded by 4 separate genes: GP1BA, GP1BB, GP9, and GP5 (173511). Genetic Heterogeneity of Platelet-Type Bleeding Disorders Inherited platelet disorders are a heterogeneous group of bleeding disorders affecting platelet number, function, or both. Functional defects can involve platelet receptors, signaling pathways, cytoskeletal proteins, granule contents, activation, or aggregation (review by Cox et al., 2011 and Nurden and Nurden, 2011). Platelet-type bleeding disorders include Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BDPLT1); Glanzmann thrombasthenia (BDPLT2; 273800), caused by mutation in the ITGA2B (607759) or ITGB3 (173470) gene; pseudo-von Willebrand disease (BDPLT3; 177820), caused by mutation in the GP1BA gene (606672); gray platelet syndrome (BDPLT4; 139090), caused by mutation in the NBEAL2 gene (614169); Quebec platelet disorder (BDPLT5; 601709), caused by tandem duplication of the PLAU gene (191840); May-Hegglin anomaly (BDPLT6; 155100), caused by mutation in the MYH9 gene (160775); Scott syndrome (BDPLT7; 262890), caused by mutation in the TMEM16F gene (608663); BDPLT8 (609821), caused by mutation in the P2RY12 gene (600515); BDPLT9 (614200), associated with deficiency of the glycoprotein Ia/IIa receptor (see ITGA2; 192974); glycoprotein IV deficiency (BDPLT10; 608404), caused by mutation in the CD36 gene (173510); BDPLT11 (614201), caused by mutation in the GP6 gene (605546); BDPLT12 (605735), associated with a deficiency of platelet COX1 (176805); susceptibility to BDPLT13 (614009), caused by mutation in the TBXA2R gene (188070); BDPLT14 (614158), associated with deficiency of thromboxane synthetase (TBXAS1; 274180); BDPLT15 (615193), caused by mutation in the ACTN1 gene (102575); BDPLT16 (187800), caused by mutation in the ITGA2B (607759) or ITGB3 (173470) gene; BDPLT17 (187900), caused by mutation in the GFI1B gene (604383); BDPLT18 (615888), caused by mutation in the RASGRP2 gene (605577); BDPLT19 (616176), caused by mutation in the PRKACG gene (176893); BDPLT20 (616913), caused by mutation in the SLFN14 gene (614958); BDPLT21 (617443), caused by mutation in the FLI1 gene (193067); BDPLT22 (618462), caused by mutation in the EPHB2 gene (600997); BDPLT23 (619267), caused by mutation in the ITGB3 gene (173470); BDPLT24 (619271), caused by mutation in the ITGB3 gene (173470); and BDPLT25 (620486), caused by mutation in the TPM4 gene (600317). See reviews by Rao (2003), Cox et al. (2011), and Nurden and Nurden (2011). For a discussion of the genetic heterogeneity of hereditary thrombocytopenia, see THC1 (313900). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
2212
Concept ID:
C0005129
Disease or Syndrome
5.

MPI-congenital disorder of glycosylation

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by enzymatic defects in the synthesis and processing of asparagine (N)-linked glycans or oligosaccharides on glycoproteins. Type I CDGs comprise defects in the assembly of the dolichol lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO) chain and its transfer to the nascent protein. These disorders can be identified by a characteristic abnormal isoelectric focusing profile of plasma transferrin (Leroy, 2006). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). CDG Ib is clinically distinct from most other CDGs by the lack of significant central nervous system involvement. The predominant symptoms are chronic diarrhea with failure to thrive and protein-losing enteropathy with coagulopathy. Some patients develop hepatic fibrosis. CDG Ib is also different from other CDGs in that it can be treated effectively with oral mannose supplementation, but can be fatal if untreated (Marquardt and Denecke, 2003). Thus, CDG Ib should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with unexplained hypoglycemia, chronic diarrhea, liver disease, or coagulopathy in order to allow early diagnosis and effective therapy (Vuillaumier-Barrot et al., 2002) Freeze and Aebi (1999) reviewed CDG Ib and CDG Ic (603147). Marques-da-Silva et al. (2017) systematically reviewed the literature concerning liver involvement in CDG. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
400692
Concept ID:
C1865145
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Noonan syndrome 4

Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
339908
Concept ID:
C1853120
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 4

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
483344
Concept ID:
C3484357
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Hereditary factor XI deficiency disease

Factor XI deficiency is an autosomal bleeding disorder characterized by reduced levels of factor XI in plasma (less than 15 IU/dL). Bleeding occurs mainly after trauma or surgery. On the basis of the concordance or discordance of F11 antigen and activity, the disorder is classified into the more frequent cross-reactive negative (CRM-) and the rarer CRM positive (CRM+) (summary by Duga and Salomon, 2009). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
8770
Concept ID:
C0015523
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 3

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
854708
Concept ID:
C3888001
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Hereditary factor VIII deficiency disease

Hemophilia A is characterized by deficiency in factor VIII clotting activity that results in prolonged oozing after injuries, tooth extractions, or surgery, and delayed or recurrent bleeding prior to complete wound healing. The age of diagnosis and frequency of bleeding episodes are related to the level of factor VIII clotting activity. Individuals with severe hemophilia A are usually diagnosed during the first two years of life following oral or soft tissue bleeding either with procedures or due to a known family history of hemophilia. Without prophylactic treatment, individuals may average up to two to five spontaneous bleeding episodes each month including spontaneous joint bleeds or deep-muscle hematomas, and prolonged bleeding or excessive pain and swelling from minor injuries, surgery, and tooth extractions. Individuals with moderate hemophilia A seldom have spontaneous bleeding, although it varies between individuals; however, they do have prolonged or delayed bleeding after relatively minor trauma and are usually diagnosed before age five to six years; the frequency of bleeding episodes varies, usually from once a month to once a year. Individuals with mild hemophilia A do not have spontaneous bleeding episodes; however, without pre- and postoperative treatment, abnormal bleeding occurs with surgery or tooth extractions; the frequency of bleeding episodes varies widely, typically from once a year to once every ten years. Individuals with mild hemophilia A are often not diagnosed until later in life. Approximately 30% of heterozygous females have factor VIII clotting activity below 40% and are at risk for bleeding (even if males in the family are only mildly affected). After major trauma or invasive procedures, prolonged or excessive bleeding usually occurs, regardless of severity. In addition, 25% of heterozygous females with normal factor VIII clotting activity report an increased bleeding tendency. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
5501
Concept ID:
C0019069
Disease or Syndrome
11.

von Willebrand disease type 3

Von Willebrand disease (VWD), a congenital bleeding disorder caused by deficient or defective plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF), may only become apparent on hemostatic challenge, and bleeding history may become more apparent with increasing age. Recent guidelines on VWD have recommended taking a VWF level of 30 or 40 IU/dL as a cutoff for those diagnosed with the disorder. Individuals with VWF levels greater than 30 IU/dL and lower than 50 IU/dL can be described as having a risk factor for bleeding. This change in guidelines significantly alters the proportion of individuals with each disease type. Type 1 VWD (~30% of VWD) typically manifests as mild mucocutaneous bleeding. Type 2 VWD accounts for approximately 60% of VWD. Type 2 subtypes include: Type 2A, which usually manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2B, which typically manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding that can include thrombocytopenia that worsens in certain circumstances; Type 2M, which typically manifests as mild-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2N, which can manifest as excessive bleeding with surgery and mimics mild hemophilia A. Type 3 VWD (<10% of VWD) manifests with severe mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal bleeding. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
266075
Concept ID:
C1264041
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Congenital afibrinogenemia

Inherited disorders of fibrinogen affect either the quantity (afibrinogenemia and hypofibrinogenemia; 202400) or the quality (dysfibrinogenemia; 616004) of the circulating fibrinogen or both (hypodysfibrinogenemia; see 616004). Afibrinogenemia is characterized by the complete absence of immunoreactive fibrinogen. Bleeding due to afibrinogenemia usually manifests in the neonatal period, with 85% of cases presenting umbilical cord bleeding, but a later age of onst is not unusual. Bleeding may occur in the skin, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, or the central nervous system, with intracranial hemorrhage being reported as the major cause of death. Patients are susceptible to spontaneous rupture of the spleen. Menstruating women may experience menometrorrhagia. First-trimester abortion is common. Both arterial and venous thromboembolic complications have been reported (summary by de Moerloose and Neerman-Arbez, 2009). Hypofibrinogenemia is characterized by reduced amounts of immunoreactive fibrinogen. Patients are often heterozygous carriers of afibrinogenemia mutations and are usually asymptomatic. However, they may bleed when exposed to trauma or if they have a second associated hemostatic abnormality. Women may experience miscarriages. Liver disease occurs in rare cases (summary by de Moerloose and Neerman-Arbez, 2009). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
749036
Concept ID:
C2584774
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 36

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-36 (DEE36) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the onset of seizures at a mean age of 6.5 months. Most patients present with infantile spasms associated with hypsarrhythmia on EEG, consistent with a clinical diagnosis of West syndrome. The seizures tend to be refractory to treatment, although some patients may respond to benzodiazepines or a ketogenic diet. Affected individuals have severely delayed psychomotor development with poor motor function, severe intellectual disability, poor or absent speech, and limited eye contact. More variable features include feeding difficulties sometimes requiring tube feeding, ocular defects including cortical visual impairment, dysmorphic facial features, and scoliosis or osteopenia. The vast majority of patients reported have been females, although rare affected males with a similar phenotype have been described. Most patients show normal N-glycosylation on transferrin isoelectric focusing, but some show abnormal N-glycosylation consistent with CDG type I (summary by Ng et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350. For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1382656
Concept ID:
C4317295
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Sitosterolemia 1

Sitosterolemia is characterized by: Hypercholesterolemia (especially in children) which (1) shows an unexpected significant lowering of plasma cholesterol level in response to low-fat diet modification or to bile acid sequestrant therapy; or (2) does not respond to statin therapy; Tendon xanthomas or tuberous (i.e., planar) xanthomas that can occur in childhood and in unusual locations (heels, knees, elbows, and buttocks); Premature atherosclerosis, which can lead to angina, aortic valve involvement, myocardial infarction, and sudden death; Hemolytic anemia, abnormally shaped erythrocytes (stomatocytes), and large platelets (macrothrombocytopenia). On occasion, the abnormal hematologic findings may be the initial presentation or the only clinical feature of this disorder. Arthritis, arthralgias, and splenomegaly may sometimes be seen and one study has concluded that "idiopathic" liver disease could be undiagnosed sitosterolemia. The clinical spectrum of sitosterolemia is probably not fully appreciated due to underdiagnosis and the fact that the phenotype in infants is likely to be highly dependent on diet. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
440869
Concept ID:
C2749759
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Factor XIII, A subunit, deficiency of

Factor XIII deficiency is an autosomal recessive hematologic disorder characterized by increased bleeding and poor wound healing. Most cases of congenital factor XIII deficiency result from mutation in the A subunit (Kangsadalampai et al., 1999). Ichinose et al. (1996, 2000) proposed a classification of factor XIII deficiency: XIIIA deficiency (formerly 'type II' F13 deficiency) and XIIIB deficiency (formerly 'type I' F13 deficiency), as well as a possible combined deficiency of the 2. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
442497
Concept ID:
C2750514
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis 1

Any arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the VPS33B gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
347219
Concept ID:
C1859722
Disease or Syndrome
17.

3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type VIIB

CLPB (caseinolytic peptidase B) deficiency is characterized by neurologic involvement and neutropenia, which can range from severe to mild. In severe CLPB deficiency, death usually occurs at a few months of age due to significant neonatal neurologic involvement (hyperekplexia or absence of voluntary movements, hypotonia or hypertonia, swallowing problems, respiratory insufficiency, and epilepsy) and severe neutropenia associated with life-threatening infections. Individuals with moderate CLPB deficiency present with neurologic abnormalities in infancy including hypotonia and feeding problems, and develop spasticity, a progressive movement disorder (ataxia, dystonia, and/or dyskinesia), epilepsy, and intellectual disability. Neutropenia is variable, but not life threatening. In those with mild CLPB deficiency there is no neurologic involvement, intellect is normal, neutropenia is mild and intermittent, and life expectancy is normal. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1810214
Concept ID:
C5676893
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Wolfram syndrome 2

Wolfram syndrome-2 (WFS2) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus, high frequency sensorineural hearing loss, optic atrophy or neuropathy, and defective platelet aggregation resulting in peptic ulcer bleeding (summary by Mozzillo et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Wolfram syndrome, see WFS1 (222300). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
347604
Concept ID:
C1858028
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Gray platelet syndrome

The gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by mild to moderate bleeding tendency, moderate thrombocytopenia, and a marked decrease or absence of platelet alpha-granules and of the proteins contained in alpha-granules. The platelets are enlarged, but not giant, and have a gray appearance on light microscopy of Wright-stained peripheral blood smears due to decreased granules. Many patients with gray platelet syndrome develop a stable myelofibrosis (summary by Nurden and Nurden, 2007). Cases suggesting autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance have been described, indicating that GPS is probably a genetically heterogeneous disorder with more than one molecular cause. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82900
Concept ID:
C0272302
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Leukocyte adhesion deficiency 3

Leukocyte adhesion deficiency-3 (LAD3), also known as LAD1 variant (LAD1V), is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by LAD1 (116920)-like immune deficiency and Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT; 273800)-like bleeding problems. LAD3 results from mutations in FERMT3, or KINDLIN3, which encodes an intracellular protein that interacts with beta-integrins in hematopoietic cells. In LAD3, the adhesive functions of integrins on both leukocytes and platelets are disrupted, most likely due to defects in activation-dependent alterations of surface integrins that enable high-avidity binding to ligands on target cells, a process termed 'inside-out signaling' (Svensson et al., 2009; Zimmerman, 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of leukocyte adhesion deficiency, see 116920. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
411605
Concept ID:
C2748536
Disease or Syndrome
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