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1.

Gaucher disease type I

Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
409531
Concept ID:
C1961835
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hereditary factor IX deficiency disease

Hemophilia B is characterized by deficiency in factor IX clotting activity that results in prolonged oozing after injuries, tooth extractions, or surgery, and delayed or recurrent bleeding prior to complete wound healing. The age of diagnosis and frequency of bleeding episodes are related to the level of factor IX clotting activity. In individuals with severe hemophilia B, spontaneous joint or deep-muscle bleeding is the most frequent sign. Individuals with severe hemophilia B are usually diagnosed during the first two years of life; without prophylactic treatment, they may average up to two to five spontaneous bleeding episodes each month. Individuals with moderate hemophilia B seldom have spontaneous bleeding; however, they do have prolonged or delayed oozing after relatively minor trauma and are usually diagnosed before age five to six years; the frequency of bleeding episodes varies from once a month to once a year. Individuals with mild hemophilia B do not have spontaneous bleeding episodes; however, without pre- and postoperative treatment, abnormal bleeding occurs with surgery or tooth extractions; the frequency of bleeding may vary from once a year to once every ten years. Individuals with mild hemophilia B are often not diagnosed until later in life. In any individual with hemophilia B, bleeding episodes may be more frequent in childhood and adolescence than in adulthood. Approximately 30% of heterozygous females have factor IX clotting activity lower than 40% and are at risk for bleeding (even if the affected family member has mild hemophilia B), although symptoms are usually mild. After major trauma or invasive procedures, prolonged or excessive bleeding usually occurs, regardless of severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
945
Concept ID:
C0008533
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

The WAS-related disorders, which include Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT), and X-linked congenital neutropenia (XLN), are a spectrum of disorders of hematopoietic cells, with predominant defects of platelets and lymphocytes caused by pathogenic variants in WAS. WAS-related disorders usually present in infancy. Affected males have thrombocytopenia with intermittent mucosal bleeding, bloody diarrhea, and intermittent or chronic petechiae and purpura; eczema; and recurrent bacterial and viral infections, particularly of the ear. At least 40% of those who survive the early complications develop one or more autoimmune conditions including hemolytic anemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, immune-mediated neutropenia, rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, and immune-mediated damage to the kidneys and liver. Individuals with a WAS-related disorder, particularly those who have been exposed to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are at increased risk of developing lymphomas, which often occur in unusual, extranodal locations including the brain, lung, or gastrointestinal tract. Males with XLT have thrombocytopenia with small platelets; other complications of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, including eczema and immune dysfunction, are usually mild or absent. Males with XLN have congenital neutropenia, myeloid dysplasia, and lymphoid cell abnormalities. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
21921
Concept ID:
C0043194
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 1

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
419514
Concept ID:
C2931875
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Macrothrombocytopenia and granulocyte inclusions with or without nephritis or sensorineural hearing loss

MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is characterized in all affected individuals by hematologic features present from birth consisting of platelet macrocytosis (i.e., >40% of platelets larger than 3.9 µm in diameter), thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150 x 109/L), and aggregates of the MYH9 protein in the cytoplasm of neutrophil granulocytes. Most affected individuals develop one or more additional extrahematologic manifestations of the disease over their lifetime, including sensorineural hearing loss, renal disease (manifesting initially as glomerular nephropathy), presenile cataracts, and/or elevation of liver enzymes. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1704278
Concept ID:
C5200934
Disease or Syndrome
6.

von Willebrand disease type 1

Von Willebrand disease (VWD), a congenital bleeding disorder caused by deficient or defective plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF), may only become apparent on hemostatic challenge, and bleeding history may become more apparent with increasing age. Recent guidelines on VWD have recommended taking a VWF level of 30 or 40 IU/dL as a cutoff for those diagnosed with the disorder. Individuals with VWF levels greater than 30 IU/dL and lower than 50 IU/dL can be described as having a risk factor for bleeding. This change in guidelines significantly alters the proportion of individuals with each disease type. Type 1 VWD (~30% of VWD) typically manifests as mild mucocutaneous bleeding. Type 2 VWD accounts for approximately 60% of VWD. Type 2 subtypes include: Type 2A, which usually manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2B, which typically manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding that can include thrombocytopenia that worsens in certain circumstances; Type 2M, which typically manifests as mild-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2N, which can manifest as excessive bleeding with surgery and mimics mild hemophilia A. Type 3 VWD (<10% of VWD) manifests with severe mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal bleeding. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
220393
Concept ID:
C1264039
Disease or Syndrome
7.

von Willebrand disease type 2

Von Willebrand disease (VWD), a congenital bleeding disorder caused by deficient or defective plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF), may only become apparent on hemostatic challenge, and bleeding history may become more apparent with increasing age. Recent guidelines on VWD have recommended taking a VWF level of 30 or 40 IU/dL as a cutoff for those diagnosed with the disorder. Individuals with VWF levels greater than 30 IU/dL and lower than 50 IU/dL can be described as having a risk factor for bleeding. This change in guidelines significantly alters the proportion of individuals with each disease type. Type 1 VWD (~30% of VWD) typically manifests as mild mucocutaneous bleeding. Type 2 VWD accounts for approximately 60% of VWD. Type 2 subtypes include: Type 2A, which usually manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2B, which typically manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding that can include thrombocytopenia that worsens in certain circumstances; Type 2M, which typically manifests as mild-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2N, which can manifest as excessive bleeding with surgery and mimics mild hemophilia A. Type 3 VWD (<10% of VWD) manifests with severe mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal bleeding. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
224736
Concept ID:
C1264040
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1

The phenotypic spectrum of ATP8B1 deficiency ranges from severe through moderate to mild. Severe ATP8B1 deficiency is characterized by infantile-onset cholestasis that progresses to cirrhosis, hepatic failure, and early death. Although mild-to-moderate ATP8B1 deficiency initially was thought to involve intermittent symptomatic cholestasis with a lack of hepatic fibrosis, it is now known that hepatic fibrosis may be present early in the disease course. Furthermore, in some persons with ATP8B1 deficiency the clinical findings can span the phenotypic spectrum, shifting over time from the mild end of the spectrum (episodic cholestasis) to the severe end of the spectrum (persistent cholestasis). Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is common across the phenotypic spectrum. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1645830
Concept ID:
C4551898
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Juvenile polyposis/hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome

Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the presence of multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) that lack intervening capillaries and result in direct connections between arteries and veins. The most common clinical manifestation is spontaneous and recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis) beginning on average at age 12 years. Telangiectases (small AVMs) are characteristically found on the lips, tongue, buccal and gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa, face, and fingers. The appearance of telangiectases is generally later than epistaxis but may be during childhood. Large AVMs occur most often in the lungs, liver, or brain; complications from bleeding or shunting may be sudden and catastrophic. A minority of individuals with HHT have GI bleeding, which is rarely seen before age 50 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
331400
Concept ID:
C1832942
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Bernard Soulier syndrome

Bernard-Soulier syndrome is an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder caused by a defect in or deficiency of the platelet membrane von Willebrand factor (VWF; 613160) receptor complex, glycoprotein Ib (GP Ib). GP Ib is composed of 4 subunits encoded by 4 separate genes: GP1BA, GP1BB, GP9, and GP5 (173511). Genetic Heterogeneity of Platelet-Type Bleeding Disorders Inherited platelet disorders are a heterogeneous group of bleeding disorders affecting platelet number, function, or both. Functional defects can involve platelet receptors, signaling pathways, cytoskeletal proteins, granule contents, activation, or aggregation (review by Cox et al., 2011 and Nurden and Nurden, 2011). Platelet-type bleeding disorders include Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BDPLT1); Glanzmann thrombasthenia (BDPLT2; 273800), caused by mutation in the ITGA2B (607759) or ITGB3 (173470) gene; pseudo-von Willebrand disease (BDPLT3; 177820), caused by mutation in the GP1BA gene (606672); gray platelet syndrome (BDPLT4; 139090), caused by mutation in the NBEAL2 gene (614169); Quebec platelet disorder (BDPLT5; 601709), caused by tandem duplication of the PLAU gene (191840); May-Hegglin anomaly (BDPLT6; 155100), caused by mutation in the MYH9 gene (160775); Scott syndrome (BDPLT7; 262890), caused by mutation in the TMEM16F gene (608663); BDPLT8 (609821), caused by mutation in the P2RY12 gene (600515); BDPLT9 (614200), associated with deficiency of the glycoprotein Ia/IIa receptor (see ITGA2; 192974); glycoprotein IV deficiency (BDPLT10; 608404), caused by mutation in the CD36 gene (173510); BDPLT11 (614201), caused by mutation in the GP6 gene (605546); BDPLT12 (605735), associated with a deficiency of platelet COX1 (176805); susceptibility to BDPLT13 (614009), caused by mutation in the TBXA2R gene (188070); BDPLT14 (614158), associated with deficiency of thromboxane synthetase (TBXAS1; 274180); BDPLT15 (615193), caused by mutation in the ACTN1 gene (102575); BDPLT16 (187800), caused by mutation in the ITGA2B (607759) or ITGB3 (173470) gene; BDPLT17 (187900), caused by mutation in the GFI1B gene (604383); BDPLT18 (615888), caused by mutation in the RASGRP2 gene (605577); BDPLT19 (616176), caused by mutation in the PRKACG gene (176893); BDPLT20 (616913), caused by mutation in the SLFN14 gene (614958); BDPLT21 (617443), caused by mutation in the FLI1 gene (193067); BDPLT22 (618462), caused by mutation in the EPHB2 gene (600997); BDPLT23 (619267), caused by mutation in the ITGB3 gene (173470); BDPLT24 (619271), caused by mutation in the ITGB3 gene (173470); and BDPLT25 (620486), caused by mutation in the TPM4 gene (600317). See reviews by Rao (2003), Cox et al. (2011), and Nurden and Nurden (2011). For a discussion of the genetic heterogeneity of hereditary thrombocytopenia, see THC1 (313900). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
2212
Concept ID:
C0005129
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Congenital prothrombin deficiency

Prothrombin deficiency is an extremely rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by low levels of circulating prothrombin; it affects about 1 in 2,000,000 individuals. There are 2 main types: type I deficiency, known as true prothrombin deficiency or 'hypoprothrombinemia,' is defined as plasma levels of prothrombin being less than 10% of normal with a concomitant decrease in activity. These patients have severe bleeding from birth, including umbilical cord hemorrhage, hematomas, ecchymoses, hematuria, mucosal bleeding, hemarthroses, intracranial bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, and menorrhagia. Type II deficiency, known as 'dysprothrombinemia,' is characterized by normal or low-normal synthesis of a dysfunctional protein. Bleeding symptoms are more variable, depending on the amount of residual functional activity. Variant prothrombin gene alleles can result in 'hypoprothrombinemia' or 'dysprothrombinemia,' and individuals who are compound heterozygous for these 2 types of alleles have variable manifestations. Heterozygous mutation carriers, who have plasma levels between 40 and 60% of normal, are usually asymptomatic, but can show bleeding after tooth extraction or surgical procedures (review by Lancellotti and De Cristofaro, 2009). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
124425
Concept ID:
C0272317
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Thrombocytopenia 1

The WAS-related disorders, which include Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT), and X-linked congenital neutropenia (XLN), are a spectrum of disorders of hematopoietic cells, with predominant defects of platelets and lymphocytes caused by pathogenic variants in WAS. WAS-related disorders usually present in infancy. Affected males have thrombocytopenia with intermittent mucosal bleeding, bloody diarrhea, and intermittent or chronic petechiae and purpura; eczema; and recurrent bacterial and viral infections, particularly of the ear. At least 40% of those who survive the early complications develop one or more autoimmune conditions including hemolytic anemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, immune-mediated neutropenia, rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, and immune-mediated damage to the kidneys and liver. Individuals with a WAS-related disorder, particularly those who have been exposed to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are at increased risk of developing lymphomas, which often occur in unusual, extranodal locations including the brain, lung, or gastrointestinal tract. Males with XLT have thrombocytopenia with small platelets; other complications of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, including eczema and immune dysfunction, are usually mild or absent. Males with XLN have congenital neutropenia, myeloid dysplasia, and lymphoid cell abnormalities. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
326416
Concept ID:
C1839163
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 6

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
854714
Concept ID:
C3888007
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
854711
Concept ID:
C3888004
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 7

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
481386
Concept ID:
C3279756
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 8

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
854728
Concept ID:
C3888026
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 4

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
483344
Concept ID:
C3484357
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Hereditary factor VIII deficiency disease

Hemophilia A is characterized by deficiency in factor VIII clotting activity that results in prolonged oozing after injuries, tooth extractions, or surgery, and delayed or recurrent bleeding prior to complete wound healing. The age of diagnosis and frequency of bleeding episodes are related to the level of factor VIII clotting activity. Individuals with severe hemophilia A are usually diagnosed during the first two years of life following oral or soft tissue bleeding either with procedures or due to a known family history of hemophilia. Without prophylactic treatment, individuals may average up to two to five spontaneous bleeding episodes each month including spontaneous joint bleeds or deep-muscle hematomas, and prolonged bleeding or excessive pain and swelling from minor injuries, surgery, and tooth extractions. Individuals with moderate hemophilia A seldom have spontaneous bleeding, although it varies between individuals; however, they do have prolonged or delayed bleeding after relatively minor trauma and are usually diagnosed before age five to six years; the frequency of bleeding episodes varies, usually from once a month to once a year. Individuals with mild hemophilia A do not have spontaneous bleeding episodes; however, without pre- and postoperative treatment, abnormal bleeding occurs with surgery or tooth extractions; the frequency of bleeding episodes varies widely, typically from once a year to once every ten years. Individuals with mild hemophilia A are often not diagnosed until later in life. Approximately 30% of heterozygous females have factor VIII clotting activity below 40% and are at risk for bleeding (even if males in the family are only mildly affected). After major trauma or invasive procedures, prolonged or excessive bleeding usually occurs, regardless of severity. In addition, 25% of heterozygous females with normal factor VIII clotting activity report an increased bleeding tendency. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
5501
Concept ID:
C0019069
Disease or Syndrome
19.

von Willebrand disease type 3

Von Willebrand disease (VWD), a congenital bleeding disorder caused by deficient or defective plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF), may only become apparent on hemostatic challenge, and bleeding history may become more apparent with increasing age. Recent guidelines on VWD have recommended taking a VWF level of 30 or 40 IU/dL as a cutoff for those diagnosed with the disorder. Individuals with VWF levels greater than 30 IU/dL and lower than 50 IU/dL can be described as having a risk factor for bleeding. This change in guidelines significantly alters the proportion of individuals with each disease type. Type 1 VWD (~30% of VWD) typically manifests as mild mucocutaneous bleeding. Type 2 VWD accounts for approximately 60% of VWD. Type 2 subtypes include: Type 2A, which usually manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2B, which typically manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding that can include thrombocytopenia that worsens in certain circumstances; Type 2M, which typically manifests as mild-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2N, which can manifest as excessive bleeding with surgery and mimics mild hemophilia A. Type 3 VWD (<10% of VWD) manifests with severe mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal bleeding. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
266075
Concept ID:
C1264041
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Congenital afibrinogenemia

Inherited disorders of fibrinogen affect either the quantity (afibrinogenemia and hypofibrinogenemia; 202400) or the quality (dysfibrinogenemia; 616004) of the circulating fibrinogen or both (hypodysfibrinogenemia; see 616004). Afibrinogenemia is characterized by the complete absence of immunoreactive fibrinogen. Bleeding due to afibrinogenemia usually manifests in the neonatal period, with 85% of cases presenting umbilical cord bleeding, but a later age of onst is not unusual. Bleeding may occur in the skin, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, or the central nervous system, with intracranial hemorrhage being reported as the major cause of death. Patients are susceptible to spontaneous rupture of the spleen. Menstruating women may experience menometrorrhagia. First-trimester abortion is common. Both arterial and venous thromboembolic complications have been reported (summary by de Moerloose and Neerman-Arbez, 2009). Hypofibrinogenemia is characterized by reduced amounts of immunoreactive fibrinogen. Patients are often heterozygous carriers of afibrinogenemia mutations and are usually asymptomatic. However, they may bleed when exposed to trauma or if they have a second associated hemostatic abnormality. Women may experience miscarriages. Liver disease occurs in rare cases (summary by de Moerloose and Neerman-Arbez, 2009). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
749036
Concept ID:
C2584774
Disease or Syndrome
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