U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 1 to 20 of 29

1.

Tay-Sachs disease

HEXA disorders are best considered as a disease continuum based on the amount of residual beta-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) enzyme activity. This, in turn, depends on the molecular characteristics and biological impact of the HEXA pathogenic variants. HEX A is necessary for degradation of GM2 ganglioside; without well-functioning enzymes, GM2 ganglioside builds up in the lysosomes of brain and nerve cells. The classic clinical phenotype is known as Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills beginning between ages three and six months, decreased visual attentiveness, and increased or exaggerated startle response with a cherry-red spot observable on the retina followed by developmental plateau and loss of skills after eight to ten months. Seizures are common by 12 months with further deterioration in the second year of life and death occurring between ages two and three years with some survival to five to seven years. Subacute juvenile TSD is associated with normal developmental milestones until age two years, when the emergence of abnormal gait or dysarthria is noted followed by loss of previously acquired skills and cognitive decline. Spasticity, dysphagia, and seizures are present by the end of the first decade of life, with death within the second decade of life, usually by aspiration. Late-onset TSD presents in older teens or young adults with a slowly progressive spectrum of neurologic symptoms including lower-extremity weakness with muscle atrophy, dysarthria, incoordination, tremor, mild spasticity and/or dystonia, and psychiatric manifestations including acute psychosis. Clinical variability even among affected members of the same family is observed in both the subacute juvenile and the late-onset TSD phenotypes. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
11713
Concept ID:
C0039373
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Sandhoff disease

Sandhoff disease comprises a phenotypic continuum encompassing acute infantile, subacute juvenile, and late-onset disease. Although classification into these phenotypes is somewhat arbitrary, it is helpful in understanding the variation observed in the timing of disease onset, presenting manifestations, rate of progression, and life span. Acute infantile Sandhoff disease (onset age <6 months). Infants are generally normal at birth followed by progressive weakness and slowing of developmental progress, then developmental regression and severe neurologic impairment. Seizures are common. Death usually occurs between ages two and three years. Subacute juvenile Sandhoff disease (onset age 2-5 years). After attaining normal developmental milestones, developmental progress slows, followed by developmental regression and neurologic impairment (abnormal gait, dysarthria, and cognitive decline). Death (usually from aspiration) typically occurs in the early to late teens. Late-onset Sandhoff disease (onset older teen years or young adulthood). Nearly normal psychomotor development is followed by a range of neurologic findings (e.g., weakness, spasticity, dysarthria, and deficits in cerebellar function) and psychiatric findings (e.g., deficits in executive function and memory). Life expectancy is not necessarily decreased. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
11313
Concept ID:
C0036161
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type A, 4

Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is characterized by hypotonia, symmetric generalized muscle weakness, and CNS migration disturbances that result in changes consistent with cobblestone lissencephaly with cerebral and cerebellar cortical dysplasia. Mild, typical, and severe phenotypes are recognized. Onset typically occurs in early infancy with poor suck, weak cry, and floppiness. Affected individuals have contractures of the hips, knees, and interphalangeal joints. Later features include myopathic facial appearance, pseudohypertrophy of the calves and forearms, motor and speech delays, intellectual disability, seizures, ophthalmologic abnormalities including visual impairment and retinal dysplasia, and progressive cardiac involvement after age ten years. Swallowing disturbance occurs in individuals with severe FCMD and in individuals older than age ten years, leading to recurrent aspiration pneumonia and death. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
140820
Concept ID:
C0410174
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hyperekplexia 1

Hyperekplexia is an early-onset neurologic disorder characterized by an exaggerated startle response to sudden, unexpected auditory or tactile stimuli. Affected individuals have brief episodes of intense, generalized hypertonia in response to stimulation. Neonates may have prolonged periods of rigidity and are at risk for sudden death from apnea or aspiration. Many affected infants have inguinal hernias. The symptoms tend to resolve after infancy, but adults may have increased startle-induced falls and/or experience nocturnal muscle jerks (summary by Ryan et al., 1992). Genetic Heterogeneity of Hyperekplexia See also HKPX2 (614619), caused by mutation in the GLRB gene (138492) on chromosome 4q31; HKPX3 (614618), caused by mutation in the GLYT2 gene (SLC6A5; 604159) on chromosome 11p15; and HKPX4 (618011), caused by mutation in the ATAD1 gene (614452) on chromosome 10q23. Hyperekplexia can also occur in developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-8 (DEE8; 300607), caused by mutation in the ARHGEF9 gene (300429). See also sporadic stiff-man syndrome (184850) and the 'Jumping Frenchmen of Maine' (244100). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1647581
Concept ID:
C4551954
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 8

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-8 (DEE8) is an X-linked disorder characterized by seizure onset before 2 years of age and severe developmental delay. Some patients have hyperekplexia (summary by Shimojima et al., 2011). For general phenotypic descriptions and discussions of genetic heterogeneity of developmental and epileptic encephalopathy and hyperekplexia, see DEE1 (308350) and HKPX1 (149400), respectively. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
375581
Concept ID:
C1845102
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Deficiency of aromatic-L-amino-acid decarboxylase

Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency (AADCD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error in neurotransmitter metabolism that leads to combined serotonin and catecholamine deficiency (Abeling et al., 2000). The disorder is clinically characterized by vegetative symptoms, oculogyric crises, dystonia, and severe neurologic dysfunction, usually beginning in infancy or childhood (summary by Brun et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
220945
Concept ID:
C1291564
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Congenital microcephaly - severe encephalopathy - progressive cerebral atrophy syndrome

Asparagine synthetase deficiency (ASD) mainly presents as a triad of congenital microcephaly, severe developmental delay, and axial hypotonia followed by spastic quadriplegia. Low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine level can help the clinician in differentiating this disorder from others. In most cases age of onset of apnea, excessive irritability, and seizures is soon after birth. Affected individuals typically do not acquire any developmental milestones. Spastic quadriplegia can lead to severe contractures of the limbs and neurogenic scoliosis. Feeding difficulties (gastroesophageal reflux disease, frequent vomiting, swallowing dysfunction, and gastroesophageal incoordination) are a significant problem in most affected individuals. A majority have cortical blindness. MRI findings are nonspecific but may include generalized atrophy and simplified gyral pattern. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
816301
Concept ID:
C3809971
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Tay-Sachs disease, variant AB

Acute infantile GM2 activator deficiency is a neurodegenerative disorder in which infants, who are generally normal at birth, have progressive weakness and slowing of developmental progress between ages four and 12 months. An ensuing developmental plateau is followed by progressively rapid developmental regression. By the second year of life decerebrate posturing, difficulty in swallowing, and worsening seizures lead to an unresponsive vegetative state. Death usually occurs between ages two and three years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78657
Concept ID:
C0268275
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Hyperekplexia 2

Hereditary hyperekplexia is a condition in which affected infants have increased muscle tone (hypertonia) and an exaggerated startle reaction to unexpected stimuli, especially loud noises. Following the startle reaction, infants experience a brief period in which they are very rigid and unable to move. During these rigid periods, some infants stop breathing, which, if prolonged, can be fatal. Infants with hereditary hyperekplexia have hypertonia at all times, except when they are sleeping.

Other signs and symptoms of hereditary hyperekplexia can include muscle twitches when falling asleep (hypnagogic myoclonus) and movements of the arms or legs while asleep. Some infants, when tapped on the nose, extend their head forward and have spasms of the limb and neck muscles. Rarely, infants with hereditary hyperekplexia experience recurrent seizures (epilepsy).

Hereditary hyperekplexia may explain some cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), which is a major cause of unexplained death in babies younger than 1 year.

The signs and symptoms of hereditary hyperekplexia typically fade by age 1. However, older individuals with hereditary hyperekplexia may still startle easily and have periods of rigidity, which can cause them to fall down. They may also continue to have hypnagogic myoclonus or movements during sleep. As they get older, individuals with this condition may have a low tolerance for crowded places and loud noises. People with hereditary hyperekplexia who have epilepsy have the seizure disorder throughout their lives. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
766205
Concept ID:
C3553291
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Hyperekplexia 3

The signs and symptoms of hereditary hyperekplexia typically fade by age 1. However, older individuals with hereditary hyperekplexia may still startle easily and have periods of rigidity, which can cause them to fall down. They may also continue to have hypnagogic myoclonus or movements during sleep. As they get older, individuals with this condition may have a low tolerance for crowded places and loud noises. People with hereditary hyperekplexia who have epilepsy have the seizure disorder throughout their lives.

Hereditary hyperekplexia may explain some cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), which is a major cause of unexplained death in babies younger than 1 year.

Other signs and symptoms of hereditary hyperekplexia can include muscle twitches when falling asleep (hypnagogic myoclonus) and movements of the arms or legs while asleep. Some infants, when tapped on the nose, extend their head forward and have spasms of the limb and neck muscles. Rarely, infants with hereditary hyperekplexia experience recurrent seizures (epilepsy).

Hereditary hyperekplexia is a condition in which affected infants have increased muscle tone (hypertonia) and an exaggerated startle reaction to unexpected stimuli, especially loud noises. Following the startle reaction, infants experience a brief period in which they are very rigid and unable to move. During these rigid periods, some infants stop breathing, which, if prolonged, can be fatal. Infants with hereditary hyperekplexia have hypertonia at all times, except when they are sleeping. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
766202
Concept ID:
C3553288
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Atypical glycine encephalopathy

GLYT1 encephalopathy is characterized in neonates by severe hypotonia, respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, and absent neonatal reflexes; encephalopathy, including impaired consciousness and unresponsiveness, may be present. Arthrogryposis or joint laxity can be observed. Generalized hypotonia develops later into axial hypotonia with limb hypertonicity and a startle-like response to vocal and visual stimuli which should not be confused with seizures. To date, three of the six affected children reported from three families died between ages two days and seven months; the oldest reported living child is severely globally impaired at age three years. Because of the limited number of affected individuals reported to date, the phenotype has not yet been completely described. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
934910
Concept ID:
C4310943
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Stiff-man syndrome

The stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is most often an adult-onset sporadic acquired disorder characterized by progressive muscle stiffness with superimposed painful muscle spasms accompanied by electromyographic evidence of continuous motor activity at rest. SPS has been associated with autoimmune disorders, diabetes mellitus, thyrotoxicosis, and hypopituitarism with adrenal insufficiency (George et al., 1984). Approximately 60% of patients with SPS have antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD2, or GAD65; 138275), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting an immune-mediated pathogenesis (Folli et al., 1993). Approximately 10% of patients develop SPS as a paraneoplastic neurologic disorder associated with antibodies to amphiphysin (AMPH; 600418), an intracellular protein associated with neuronal synaptic vesicle endocytosis (Burns, 2005). See also congenital stiff-man syndrome, or hereditary hyperexplexia (149400), which is caused by mutations in subunits of the glycine receptor gene (GLRA1, 138491; GLRB, 138492). Meinck and Thompson (2002) provided a detailed review of stiff-person syndrome. They also discussed 2 possibly related conditions, progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity (PERM), a more severe disorder with other neurologic features, and stiff-limb or stiff-leg syndrome, a focal disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
39017
Concept ID:
C0085292
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 49

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-49 (DEE49) is a severe autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of seizures in the neonatal period, global developmental delay with intellectual disability and lack of speech, hypotonia, spasticity, and coarse facial features. Some patients may have brain calcifications on imaging (summary by Han et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934602
Concept ID:
C4310635
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 68

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-68 (DEE68) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of twitching and/or myoclonic jerks in infancy. The disorder progresses to refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, often resulting in status epilepticus, loss of developmental milestones, and early death. Other features include delayed development, axial hypotonia, spasticity of the limbs, and clonus. Brain imaging may show cortical atrophy (summary by Barel et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648479
Concept ID:
C4748688
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Sudden infant death-dysgenesis of the testes syndrome

Sudden infant death with dysgenesis of the testes syndrome (SIDDT) is characterized by sudden cardiac or respiratory arrest, disordered testicular development, and neurologic dysfunction, and is uniformly fatal before 1 year of age (Slater et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
332428
Concept ID:
C1837371
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Neurodevelopmental disorder with cerebellar atrophy and with or without seizures

Neurodevelopmental disorder with cerebellar atrophy and with or without seizures (NEDCAS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intellectual disability associated with ataxia (summary by Engel et al., 2023). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648373
Concept ID:
C4748032
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Neurodevelopmental disorder with progressive microcephaly, spasticity, and brain anomalies

Neurodevelopmental disorder with progressive microcephaly, spasticity, and brain anomalies (NDMSBA) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by infantile onset of progressive microcephaly and spasticity and severe global developmental delay resulting in profoundly impaired intellectual development and severely impaired or absent motor function. More variable features include seizures and optic atrophy. Brain imaging may show myelinating abnormalities and white matter lesions consistent with a leukoencephalopathy, as well as structural anomalies, including thin corpus callosum, gyral abnormalities, and cerebral or cerebellar atrophy. Some patients die in early childhood (summary by Falik Zaccai et al., 2017 and Hall et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1380260
Concept ID:
C4479631
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy 13

Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-13 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by infantile onset of delayed psychomotor development, axial hypotonia, and spasticity associated with delayed myelination and periventricular white matter abnormalities on brain imaging. More variable neurologic deficits, such as visual impairment, may also occur. Some patients may experience cardiac failure during acute illness (summary by Edvardson et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of HLD, see 312080. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
896545
Concept ID:
C4225170
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Spastic tetraplegia and axial hypotonia, progressive

Progressive spastic tetraplegia and axial hypotonia (STAHP) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of severe and progressive motor dysfunction in the first year of life. Affected individuals have severe axial hypotonia combined with spastic tetraplegia, hyperekplexia, hypertonia, and myokymia, reflecting upper motor neuron involvement. Cognitive development may be affected, but only 2 unrelated patients have been reported (Andersen et al., 2019; Park et al., 2019). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1684731
Concept ID:
C5231422
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 54

Any autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the TNIK gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
934722
Concept ID:
C4310755
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity