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1.

Radial aplasia-thrombocytopenia syndrome

Thrombocytopenia absent radius (TAR) syndrome is characterized by bilateral absence of the radii with the presence of both thumbs, and thrombocytopenia that is generally transient. Thrombocytopenia may be congenital or may develop within the first few weeks to months of life; in general, thrombocytopenic episodes decrease with age. Cow's milk allergy is common and can be associated with exacerbation of thrombocytopenia. Other anomalies of the skeleton (upper and lower limbs, ribs, and vertebrae), heart, and genitourinary system (renal anomalies and agenesis of uterus, cervix, and upper part of the vagina) can occur. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
61235
Concept ID:
C0175703
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Atelosteogenesis type I

The FLNB disorders include a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from mild to severe. At the mild end are spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) syndrome and Larsen syndrome; at the severe end are the phenotypic continuum of atelosteogenesis types I (AOI) and III (AOIII) and Piepkorn osteochondrodysplasia (POCD). SCT syndrome is characterized by postnatal disproportionate short stature, scoliosis and lordosis, clubfeet, hearing loss, dental enamel hypoplasia, carpal and tarsal synostosis, and vertebral fusions. Larsen syndrome is characterized by congenital dislocations of the hip, knee, and elbow; clubfeet (equinovarus or equinovalgus foot deformities); scoliosis and cervical kyphosis, which can be associated with a cervical myelopathy; short, broad, spatulate distal phalanges; distinctive craniofacies (prominent forehead, depressed nasal bridge, malar flattening, and widely spaced eyes); vertebral anomalies; and supernumerary carpal and tarsal bone ossification centers. Individuals with SCT syndrome and Larsen syndrome can have midline cleft palate and hearing loss. AOI and AOIII are characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism; dislocated hips, knees, and elbows; and clubfeet. AOI is lethal in the perinatal period. In individuals with AOIII, survival beyond the neonatal period is possible with intensive and invasive respiratory support. Piepkorn osteochondrodysplasia (POCD) is a perinatal-lethal micromelic dwarfism characterized by flipper-like limbs (polysyndactyly with complete syndactyly of all fingers and toes, hypoplastic or absent first digits, and duplicated intermediate and distal phalanges), macrobrachycephaly, prominant forehead, hypertelorism, and exophthalmos. Occasional features include cleft palate, omphalocele, and cardiac and genitourinary anomalies. The radiographic features at mid-gestation are characteristic. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
82701
Concept ID:
C0265283
Congenital Abnormality
3.

Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis

Most females with osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OS-CS) present with macrocephaly and characteristic facial features (frontal bossing, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, depressed nasal bridge, and prominent jaw). Approximately half have associated features including orofacial clefting and hearing loss, and a minority have some degree of developmental delay (usually mild). Radiographic findings of cranial sclerosis, sclerosis of long bones, and metaphyseal striations (in combination with macrocephaly) can be considered pathognomonic. Males can present with a mild or severe phenotype. Mildly affected males have clinical features similar to affected females, including macrocephaly, characteristic facial features, orofacial clefting, hearing loss, and mild-to-moderate learning delays. Mildly affected males are more likely than females to have congenital or musculoskeletal anomalies. Radiographic findings include cranial sclerosis and sclerosis of the long bones; Metaphyseal striations are more common in males who are mosaic for an AMER1 pathogenic variant. The severe phenotype manifests in males as a multiple-malformation syndrome, lethal in mid-to-late gestation, or in the neonatal period. Congenital malformations include skeletal defects (e.g., polysyndactyly, absent or hypoplastic fibulae), congenital heart disease, and brain, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal anomalies. Macrocephaly is not always present and longitudinal metaphyseal striations have not been observed in severely affected males, except for those who are mosaic for the AMER1 pathogenic variant. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
96590
Concept ID:
C0432268
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Boomerang dysplasia

The FLNB disorders include a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from mild to severe. At the mild end are spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) syndrome and Larsen syndrome; at the severe end are the phenotypic continuum of atelosteogenesis types I (AOI) and III (AOIII) and Piepkorn osteochondrodysplasia (POCD). SCT syndrome is characterized by postnatal disproportionate short stature, scoliosis and lordosis, clubfeet, hearing loss, dental enamel hypoplasia, carpal and tarsal synostosis, and vertebral fusions. Larsen syndrome is characterized by congenital dislocations of the hip, knee, and elbow; clubfeet (equinovarus or equinovalgus foot deformities); scoliosis and cervical kyphosis, which can be associated with a cervical myelopathy; short, broad, spatulate distal phalanges; distinctive craniofacies (prominent forehead, depressed nasal bridge, malar flattening, and widely spaced eyes); vertebral anomalies; and supernumerary carpal and tarsal bone ossification centers. Individuals with SCT syndrome and Larsen syndrome can have midline cleft palate and hearing loss. AOI and AOIII are characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism; dislocated hips, knees, and elbows; and clubfeet. AOI is lethal in the perinatal period. In individuals with AOIII, survival beyond the neonatal period is possible with intensive and invasive respiratory support. Piepkorn osteochondrodysplasia (POCD) is a perinatal-lethal micromelic dwarfism characterized by flipper-like limbs (polysyndactyly with complete syndactyly of all fingers and toes, hypoplastic or absent first digits, and duplicated intermediate and distal phalanges), macrobrachycephaly, prominant forehead, hypertelorism, and exophthalmos. Occasional features include cleft palate, omphalocele, and cardiac and genitourinary anomalies. The radiographic features at mid-gestation are characteristic. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
96579
Concept ID:
C0432201
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Orofaciodigital syndrome type 6

Orofaciodigital syndrome type VI (OFD6), or Varadi syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder distinguished from other orofaciodigital syndromes by metacarpal abnormalities with central polydactyly and by cerebellar abnormalities, including the molar tooth sign (summary by Doss et al., 1998 and Lopez et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
411200
Concept ID:
C2745997
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Schinzel phocomelia syndrome

The Al-Awadi/Raas-Rothschild/Schinzel phocomelia syndrome (AARRS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe malformations of upper and lower limbs with severely hypoplastic pelvis and abnormal genitalia. The disorder is believed to represent a defect of dorsoventral patterning and outgrowth of limbs (summary by Kantaputra et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
336388
Concept ID:
C1848651
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Acheiropodia

Acheiropody is characterized by bilateral congenital amputations of the upper and lower extremities and aplasia of the hands and feet. Specific patterns of malformations consist of a complete amputation of the distal epiphysis of the humerus, amputation of the distal part of the tibial diaphysis, and aplasia of the radius, ulna, fibula, and of the carpal, metacarpal, tarsal, metatarsal, and phalangeal bones (summary by Ianakiev et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
120547
Concept ID:
C0265559
Congenital Abnormality
8.

Fuhrmann syndrome

This syndrome has main characteristics of bowing of the femora, aplasia or hypoplasia of the fibulae and poly, oligo and syndactyly. It has been reported in 11 patients. Most of the patients also had a hypoplastic pelvis and hypoplasia of the fingers and fingernails. Some had congenital dislocation of the hip, absence or fusion of tarsal bones, absence of various metatarsals and hypoplasia and aplasia of the toes. The syndrome is caused by a partial loss of WNT7A function (gene mapped to 3p25). [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
346429
Concept ID:
C1856728
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Pelviscapular dysplasia

Syndrome with characteristics of pelviscapular dysplasia with epiphyseal abnormalities, congenital dwarfism and facial dysmorphism. The facial dysmorphism has manifestations of frontal bossing, hypertelorism, narrow palpebral fissures, deep-set eyes, strabismus, low-set posteriorly rotated and malformed ears, dysplasia of conchae, a small chin, a short neck with redundant skin folds, and a low hairline. Intelligence may vary from normal to moderately impaired. Radiographic features comprise aplasia of the body of the scapula, hypoplasia of the iliac bone, humeroradial synostosis, dislocation of the femoral heads, and moderate brachydactyly. Mutations in the TBX15 gene have been identified as potentially causative. Pelviscapular dysplasia is phenotypically similar to pelvis-shoulder dysplasia. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
342400
Concept ID:
C1850040
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Acromesomelic dysplasia 3

MedGen UID:
904735
Concept ID:
C4225404
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Acromesomelic dysplasia 2B

Acromesomelic dysplasia-2B (AMD2B) is characterized by normal head and trunk, hypoplastic/dysplastic or absent fibulae, and severe hypoplastic/dysplastic hand/feet abnormalities. Mental development is normal (summary by Szczaluba et al., 2005). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
346432
Concept ID:
C1856738
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Fibular aplasia-ectrodactyly syndrome

Ectrodactyly (split-hand/foot malformation) associated with fibular hypoplasia/aplasia is a rare disorder that appears to be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion with reduced penetrance and variable expression (Evans et al., 2002). A form of fibular hypoplasia/aplasia associated with oligosyndactyly and tibial campomelia has been reported (FATCO syndrome; 246570). Split-hand/foot malformation associated with tibial hypoplasia/aplasia has also been described (see SHFLD1, 119100). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
396290
Concept ID:
C1862100
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Fibular aplasia, tibial campomelia, and oligosyndactyly syndrome

FATCO syndrome comprises fibular aplasia, tibial campomelia, and oligosyndactyly (Courtens et al., 2005). See also ectrodactyly (split-hand/foot malformation) associated with fibular hypoplasia/aplasia (113310). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
340887
Concept ID:
C1855499
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Mesomelic dysplasia, Savarirayan type

Severely hypoplastic and triangular-shaped tibiae and absence of the fibulae.Two sporadic cases have been described. Moderate mesomelia of the upper limbs, proximal widening of the ulnas, pelvic anomalies and marked bilateral glenoid hypoplasia also reported. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
343129
Concept ID:
C1854470
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Craniosynostosis-fibular aplasia syndrome

Craniosynostosis-fibular aplasia is an extremely rare genetic disease, reported in only 2 brothers to date, characterized by the combination of craniosynostosis (involving both coronal sutures), congenital absence of the fibula, cryptorchidism, and bilateral simian creases. Intelligence is normal and an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance has been proposed. There have been no further reports in the literature since 1972. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
347468
Concept ID:
C1857492
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Orofaciodigital syndrome X

Syndrome with characteristics of facial (telecanthus, flat nasal bridge, retrognathia), oral (cleft palate, vestibular frenula) and digital (oligodactyly, preaxial polydactyly) features, associated with remarkable radial shortening, fibular agenesis and coalescence of tarsal bones. The syndrome has been described in one 10-month-old girl. No new cases have been described since 1993. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
322280
Concept ID:
C1833796
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Fibular aplasia

Absence of the fibula. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
373034
Concept ID:
C1836186
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