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1.

Hb SS disease

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by intermittent vaso-occlusive events and chronic hemolytic anemia. Vaso-occlusive events result in tissue ischemia leading to acute and chronic pain as well as organ damage that can affect any organ system, including the bones, spleen, liver, brain, lungs, kidneys, and joints. Dactylitis (pain and/or swelling of the hands or feet) is often the earliest manifestation of SCD. In children, the spleen can become engorged with blood cells in a "splenic sequestration." The spleen is particularly vulnerable to infarction and the majority of individuals with SCD who are not on hydroxyurea or transfusion therapy become functionally asplenic in early childhood, increasing their risk for certain types of bacterial infections, primarily encapsulated organisms. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of mortality in SCD. Chronic hemolysis can result in varying degrees of anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis, and delayed growth and sexual maturation as well as activating pathways that contribute to the pathophysiology directly. Individuals with the highest rates of hemolysis are at higher risk for pulmonary artery hypertension, priapism, and leg ulcers and may be relatively protected from vaso-occlusive pain. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
287
Concept ID:
C0002895
Disease or Syndrome
2.

UDPglucose-4-epimerase deficiency

Epimerase deficiency galactosemia (GALE deficiency galactosemia) is generally considered a continuum comprising several forms: Generalized. Enzyme activity is profoundly decreased in all tissues tested. Peripheral. Enzyme activity is deficient in red blood cells (RBC) and circulating white blood cells, but normal or near normal in all other tissues. Intermediate. Enzyme activity is deficient in red blood cells and circulating white blood cells and less than 50% of normal levels in other cells tested. Infants with generalized epimerase deficiency galactosemia develop clinical findings on a regular milk diet (which contains lactose, a disaccharide of galactose and glucose); manifestations include hypotonia, poor feeding, vomiting, weight loss, jaundice, hepatomegaly, liver dysfunction, aminoaciduria, and cataracts. Prompt removal of galactose/lactose from their diet resolves or prevents these acute symptoms. Longer-term features that may be seen in those with generalized epimerase deficiency include short stature, developmental delay, sensorineural hearing loss, and skeletal anomalies. In contrast, neonates with the peripheral or intermediate form generally remain clinically well even on a regular milk diet and are usually only identified by biochemical testing, often in newborn screening programs. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
199598
Concept ID:
C0751161
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Chédiak-Higashi syndrome

Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is characterized by partial oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, and a mild bleeding tendency. Approximately 85% of affected individuals develop the accelerated phase, or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, a life-threatening, hyperinflammatory condition. All affected individuals including adolescents and adults with atypical CHS and children with classic CHS who have successfully undergone allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) develop neurologic findings during early adulthood. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
3347
Concept ID:
C0007965
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) represents a clinical spectrum in which presentations can be divided into type I (neonatal onset with congenital anomalies), type II (neonatal onset without congenital anomalies), and type III (late onset). Individuals with type I or II MADD typically become symptomatic in the neonatal period with severe metabolic acidosis, which may be accompanied by profound hypoglycemia and hyperammonemia. Many affected individuals die in the newborn period despite metabolic treatment. In those who survive the neonatal period, recurrent metabolic decompensation resembling Reye syndrome and the development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can occur. Congenital anomalies may include dysmorphic facial features, large cystic kidneys, hypospadias and chordee in males, and neuronal migration defects (heterotopias) on brain MRI. Individuals with type III MADD, the most common presentation, can present from infancy to adulthood. The most common symptoms are muscle weakness, exercise intolerance, and/or muscle pain, although metabolic decompensation with episodes of rhabdomyolysis can also be seen. Rarely, individuals with late-onset MADD (type III) may develop severe sensory neuropathy in addition to proximal myopathy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75696
Concept ID:
C0268596
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hereditary fructosuria

Following dietary exposure to fructose, sucrose, or sorbitol, untreated hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is characterized by metabolic disturbances (hypoglycemia, lactic acidemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperuricemia, hypermagnesemia, hyperalaninemia) and clinical findings (nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distress; chronic growth restriction / failure to thrive). While untreated HFI typically first manifested when fructose- and sucrose-containing foods were introduced in the course of weaning young infants from breast milk, it is now presenting earlier, due to the addition of fructose-containing nutrients in infant formulas. If the infant ingests large quantities of fructose, the infant may acutely develop lethargy, seizures, and/or progressive coma. Untreated HFI may result in renal and hepatic failure. If identified and treated before permanent organ injury occurs, individuals with HFI can experience a normal quality of life and life expectancy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
42105
Concept ID:
C0016751
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Hereditary coproporphyria

Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is an acute (hepatic) porphyria in which the acute symptoms are neurovisceral and occur in discrete episodes. Attacks typically start in the abdomen with low-grade pain that slowly increases over a period of days (not hours) with nausea progressing to vomiting. In some individuals, the pain is predominantly in the back or extremities. When an acute attack is untreated, a motor neuropathy may develop over a period of days or a few weeks. The neuropathy first appears as weakness proximally in the arms and legs, then progresses distally to involve the hands and feet. Some individuals experience respiratory insufficiency due to loss of innervation of the diaphragm and muscles of respiration. Acute attacks are associated commonly with use of certain medications, caloric deprivation, and changes in female reproductive hormones. About 20% of those with an acute attack also experience photosensitivity associated with bullae and skin fragility. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
57931
Concept ID:
C0162531
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Polycystic kidney disease 2

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is generally a late-onset multisystem disorder characterized by bilateral kidney cysts, liver cysts, and an increased risk of intracranial aneurysms. Other manifestations include: cysts in the pancreas, seminal vesicles, and arachnoid membrane; dilatation of the aortic root and dissection of the thoracic aorta; mitral valve prolapse; and abdominal wall hernias. Kidney manifestations include early-onset hypertension, kidney pain, and kidney insufficiency. Approximately 50% of individuals with ADPKD have end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) by age 60 years. The prevalence of liver cysts increases with age and occasionally results in clinically significant severe polycystic liver disease (PLD), most often in females. Overall, the prevalence of intracranial aneurysms is fivefold higher than in the general population and further increased in those with a positive family history of aneurysms or subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is substantial variability in the severity of kidney disease and other extra-kidney manifestations. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
442699
Concept ID:
C2751306
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Hyperlipoproteinemia, type I

Familial lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency usually presents in childhood and is characterized by very severe hypertriglyceridemia with episodes of abdominal pain, recurrent acute pancreatitis, eruptive cutaneous xanthomata, and hepatosplenomegaly. Clearance of chylomicrons from the plasma is impaired, causing triglycerides to accumulate in plasma and the plasma to have a milky (lactescent or lipemic) appearance. Symptoms usually resolve with restriction of total dietary fat to =20 g/day. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
7352
Concept ID:
C0023817
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Hereditary spherocytosis type 1

Any hereditary spherocytosis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ANK1 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
382302
Concept ID:
C2674218
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Pyruvate kinase deficiency of red cells

Red cell pyruvate kinase deficiency is the most common cause of hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. PK deficiency is also the most frequent enzyme abnormality of the glycolytic pathway (Zanella et al., 2005). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
473069
Concept ID:
C0340968
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Glycogen storage disease, type VII

Glycogen storage disease VII is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized clinically by exercise intolerance, muscle cramping, exertional myopathy, and compensated hemolysis. Myoglobinuria may also occur. The deficiency of the muscle isoform of PFK results in a total and partial loss of muscle and red cell PFK activity, respectively. Raben and Sherman (1995) noted that not all patients with GSD VII seek medical care because in some cases it is a relatively mild disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
5342
Concept ID:
C0017926
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Navajo neurohepatopathy

MPV17-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance defect presents in the vast majority of affected individuals as an early-onset encephalohepatopathic (hepatocerebral) disease that is typically associated with mtDNA depletion, particularly in the liver. A later-onset neuromyopathic disease characterized by myopathy and neuropathy, and associated with multiple mtDNA deletions in muscle, has also rarely been described. MPV17-related mtDNA maintenance defect, encephalohepatopathic form is characterized by: Hepatic manifestations (liver dysfunction that typically progresses to liver failure, cholestasis, hepatomegaly, and steatosis); Neurologic involvement (developmental delay, hypotonia, microcephaly, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy); Gastrointestinal manifestations (gastrointestinal dysmotility, feeding difficulties, and failure to thrive); and Metabolic derangements (lactic acidosis and hypoglycemia). Less frequent manifestations include renal tubulopathy, nephrocalcinosis, and hypoparathyroidism. Progressive liver disease often leads to death in infancy or early childhood. Hepatocellular carcinoma has been reported. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
338045
Concept ID:
C1850406
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Anemia, nonspherocytic hemolytic, due to G6PD deficiency

G6PD deficiency is the most common genetic cause of chronic and drug-, food-, or infection-induced hemolytic anemia. G6PD catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, which is the only NADPH-generation process in mature red cells; therefore, defense against oxidative damage is dependent on G6PD. Most G6PD-deficient patients are asymptomatic throughout their life, but G6PD deficiency can be life-threatening. The most common clinical manifestations of G6PD deficiency are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which in most patients is triggered by an exogenous agent, e.g., primaquine or fava beans. Acute hemolysis is characterized by fatigue, back pain, anemia, and jaundice. Increased unconjugated bilirubin, lactate dehydrogenase, and reticulocytosis are markers of the disorder. The striking similarity between the areas where G6PD deficiency is common and Plasmodium falciparum malaria (see 611162) is endemic provided evidence that G6PD deficiency confers resistance against malaria (summary by Cappellini and Fiorelli, 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
403555
Concept ID:
C2720289
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 3

The two forms of deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK) deficiency are a neonatal multisystem disorder and an isolated hepatic disorder that presents later in infancy or childhood. The majority of affected individuals have the multisystem illness with hepatic disease (jaundice, cholestasis, hepatomegaly, and elevated transaminases) and neurologic manifestations (hypotonia, nystagmus, and psychomotor retardation) evident within weeks of birth. Those with isolated liver disease may also have renal involvement and some later develop mild hypotonia. Progressive hepatic disease is the most common cause of death in both forms. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1682503
Concept ID:
C5191055
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Upshaw-Schulman syndrome

Hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), also known as Upshaw-Schulman syndrome (USS), is a rare autosomal recessive thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Clinically, acute phases of TTP are defined by microangiopathic mechanical hemolytic anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, and visceral ischemia. Hereditary TTP makes up 5% of TTP cases and is caused mostly by biallelic mutation in the ADAMTS13 gene, or in very rare cases, by monoallelic ADAMTS13 mutation associated with a cluster of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); most cases of all TTP (95%) are acquired via an autoimmune mechanism (see 188030). Hereditary TTP is more frequent among child-onset TTP compared with adult-onset TTP, and its clinical presentation is significantly different as a function of its age of onset. Child-onset TTP usually starts in the neonatal period with hematological features and severe jaundice. In contrast, almost all cases of adult-onset hereditary TTP are unmasked during the first pregnancy of a woman whose disease was silent during childhood (summary by Joly et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
224783
Concept ID:
C1268935
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia, type II

Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II (CDA II) is the most common form of CDA (see this term) characterized by anemia, jaundice and splenomegaly and often leading to liver iron overload and gallstones. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
266296
Concept ID:
C1306589
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Pituitary hormone deficiency, combined, 1

Combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) in man denotes impaired production of growth hormone (GH; 139250) and one or more of the other 5 anterior pituitary hormones. Mutations of the POU1F1 gene in the human and Pit1 in the mouse are responsible for pleiotropic deficiencies of GH, prolactin (PRL; 176760), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; see 188540), while the production of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH; see 176830), luteinizing hormone (LH; 152780), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH; 136530) are preserved (Wu et al., 1998). Some patients exhibit only GH deficiency, although approximately 50% of isolated GH deficiency progresses to CPHD (Gergics et al., 2021). In infancy severe growth deficiency from birth as well as distinctive facial features with prominent forehead, marked midfacial hypoplasia with depressed nasal bridge, deep-set eyes, and a short nose with anteverted nostrils and hypoplastic pituitary gland by MRI examination can be seen (Aarskog et al., 1997). Some cases present with severe mental retardation along with short stature (Radovick et al., 1992). Reviews Voss and Rosenfeld (1992) reviewed the development and differentiation of the 5 pituitary cell types: galactotropes, gonadotropes, corticotropes, thyrotropes, and somatotropes. As indicated by the mutations in PIT1 described later, combined pituitary hormone deficiency can have either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive inheritance, depending on the part of the PIT1 molecule affected by the mutation. Some mutations have a dominant-negative effect. Genetic Heterogeneity of Combined Pituitary Hormone Deficiency CPHD2 (262600), associated with hypogonadism, is caused by mutation in the PROP1 gene (601538). CPHD3 (221750), which is associated with rigid cervical spine and variable sensorineural deafness, is caused by mutation in the LHX3 gene (600577). CPHD4 (262700) is caused by mutation in the LHX4 gene (602146). CPHD5 (see septooptic dysplasia, 182230) is caused by mutation in the HESX1 gene (601802). CPHD6 (613986) is caused by mutation in the OTX2 gene (600037). CPHD7 (618160) is caused by mutation in the RNPC3 gene (618016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
414421
Concept ID:
C2751608
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Gilbert syndrome

The hereditary hyperbilirubinemias (Wolkoff et al., 1983) include (1) those resulting in predominantly unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia: Gilbert or Arias syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (218800), and Crigler-Najjar syndrome type II (606785); and (2) those resulting in predominantly conjugated hyperbilirubinemia: Dubin-Johnson syndrome (237500), Rotor syndrome (237450), and several forms of intrahepatic cholestasis (147480, 211600, 214950, 243300). Detailed studies show that patients with Gilbert syndrome have reduced activity of bilirubin glucuronosyltransferase (Bosma et al., 1995, Koiwai et al., 1995). Genetic Heterogeneity of Hyperbilirubinemia See also Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (HBLRCN1; 218800), Crigler-Najjar syndrome type II (HBLRCN2; 606785), and transient familial neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (HBLRTFN; 237900), all caused by mutation in the UGT1A1 gene (191740) on chromosome 2q37; Dubin-Johnson syndrome (DJS, HBLRDJ; 237500), caused by mutation in the ABCC2 gene (601107) on chromosome 10q24; and Rotor syndrome (HBLRR; 237450), caused by digenic mutation in the SLCO1B1 (604843) and SLCOB3 (605495) genes, both on chromosome 12p. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
4891
Concept ID:
C0017551
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Niemann-Pick disease, type C2

Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a slowly progressive lysosomal disorder whose principal manifestations are age dependent. The manifestations in the perinatal period and infancy are predominantly visceral, with hepatosplenomegaly, jaundice, and (in some instances) pulmonary infiltrates. From late infancy onward, the presentation is dominated by neurologic manifestations. The youngest children may present with hypotonia and developmental delay, with the subsequent emergence of ataxia, dysarthria, dysphagia, and, in some individuals, epileptic seizures, dystonia, and gelastic cataplexy. Although cognitive impairment may be subtle at first, it eventually becomes apparent that affected individuals have a progressive dementia. Older teenagers and young adults may present predominantly with apparent early-onset dementia or psychiatric manifestations; however, careful examination usually identifies typical neurologic signs. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
335942
Concept ID:
C1843366
Disease or Syndrome
20.

DPAGT1-congenital disorder of glycosylation

Like all CDGs, which are caused by a shortage of precursor monosaccharide phosphate or deficiencies in the glycosyltransferases required for lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor (LLO) synthesis, CDG Ij is caused by a defect in the formation of DPAGT1, the first dolichyl-linked intermediate of the protein N-glycosylation pathway. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
419694
Concept ID:
C2931004
Disease or Syndrome
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