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1.

Cutis laxa with osteodystrophy

ATP6V0A2-related cutis laxa is characterized by generalized cutis laxa, findings associated with generalized connective tissue disorder, developmental delays, and a variety of neurologic findings including abnormality on brain MRI. At birth, hypotonia, overfolded skin, and distinctive facial features are present and enlarged fontanelles are often observed. During childhood, the characteristic facial features and thick or coarse hair may become quite pronounced. The skin findings decrease with age, although easy bruising and Ehlers-Danlos-like scars have been described in some. In most (not all) affected individuals, cortical and cerebellar malformations are observed on brain MRI. Nearly all affected individuals have developmental delays, seizures, and neurologic regression. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
82795
Concept ID:
C0268355
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Familial partial lipodystrophy, Dunnigan type

Familial partial lipodystrophy is a metabolic disorder characterized by abnormal subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution beginning in late childhood or early adult life. Affected individuals gradually lose fat from the upper and lower extremities and the gluteal and truncal regions, resulting in a muscular appearance with prominent superficial veins. In some patients, adipose tissue accumulates on the face and neck, causing a double chin, fat neck, or cushingoid appearance. Metabolic abnormalities include insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosis nigricans and hypertriglyceridemia; hirsutism and menstrual abnormalities occur infrequently. Familial partial lipodystrophy may also be referred to as lipoatrophic diabetes mellitus, but the essential feature is loss of subcutaneous fat (review by Garg, 2004). The disorder may be misdiagnosed as Cushing disease (see 219080) (Kobberling and Dunnigan, 1986; Garg, 2004). Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Partial Lipodystrophy Familial partial lipodystrophy is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Types 1 and 2 were originally described as clinical subtypes: type 1 (FPLD1; 608600), characterized by loss of subcutaneous fat confined to the limbs (Kobberling et al., 1975), and FPLD2, characterized by loss of subcutaneous fat from the limbs and trunk (Dunnigan et al., 1974; Kobberling and Dunnigan, 1986). No genetic basis for FPLD1 has yet been delineated. FPLD3 (604367) is caused by mutation in the PPARG gene (601487) on chromosome 3p25; FPLD4 (613877) is caused by mutation in the PLIN1 gene (170290) on chromosome 15q26; FPLD5 (615238) is caused by mutation in the CIDEC gene (612120) on chromosome 3p25; FPLD6 (615980) is caused by mutation in the LIPE gene (151750) on chromosome 19q13; FPLD7 (606721) is caused by mutation in the CAV1 gene (601047) on chromosome 7q31; FPLD8 (620679), caused by mutation in the ADRA2A gene (104210) on chromosome 10q25; and FPLD9 (620683), caused by mutation in the PLAAT3 gene (613867) on chromosome 11q12. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
354526
Concept ID:
C1720860
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Mandibuloacral dysplasia with type A lipodystrophy

Mandibuloacral dysplasia with type A lipodystrophy (MADA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by growth retardation, craniofacial anomalies with mandibular hypoplasia, skeletal abnormalities with progressive osteolysis of the distal phalanges and clavicles, and pigmentary skin changes. The lipodystrophy is characterized by a marked acral loss of fatty tissue with normal or increased fatty tissue in the neck and trunk. Some patients may show progeroid features. Metabolic complications can arise due to insulin resistance and diabetes (Young et al., 1971; Simha and Garg, 2002; summary by Garavelli et al., 2009). See also MAD type B (MADB; 608612), which is caused by mutation in the ZMPSTE24 gene (606480). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1757618
Concept ID:
C5399785
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 1

Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy (BSCL) is usually diagnosed at birth or soon thereafter. Because of the absence of functional adipocytes, lipid is stored in other tissues, including muscle and liver. Affected individuals develop insulin resistance and approximately 25%-35% develop diabetes mellitus between ages 15 and 20 years. Hepatomegaly secondary to hepatic steatosis and skeletal muscle hypertrophy occur in all affected individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is reported in 20%-25% of affected individuals and is a significant cause of morbidity from cardiac failure and early mortality. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
318592
Concept ID:
C1720862
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 2

Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy (BSCL) is usually diagnosed at birth or soon thereafter. Because of the absence of functional adipocytes, lipid is stored in other tissues, including muscle and liver. Affected individuals develop insulin resistance and approximately 25%-35% develop diabetes mellitus between ages 15 and 20 years. Hepatomegaly secondary to hepatic steatosis and skeletal muscle hypertrophy occur in all affected individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is reported in 20%-25% of affected individuals and is a significant cause of morbidity from cardiac failure and early mortality. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
318593
Concept ID:
C1720863
Congenital Abnormality
6.

SHORT syndrome

SHORT syndrome is a mnemonic for short stature, hyperextensibility, ocular depression (deeply set eyes), Rieger anomaly, and teething delay. It is now recognized that the features most consistently observed in SHORT syndrome are mild intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR); mild to moderate short stature; partial lipodystrophy (evident in the face, and later in the chest and upper extremities, often sparing the buttocks and legs); and a characteristic facial gestalt. Insulin resistance may be evident in mid-childhood or adolescence, although diabetes mellitus typically does not develop until early adulthood. Other frequent features include Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly or related ocular anterior chamber dysgenesis, delayed dentition and other dental issues, and sensorineural hearing loss. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
164212
Concept ID:
C0878684
Disease or Syndrome
7.

PPARG-related familial partial lipodystrophy

A rare familial partial lipodystrophy with characteristics of adult onset of distal lipoatrophy with gluteofemoral fat loss, as well as increased fat accumulation in the face and trunk and visceral adiposity. Additional manifestations include diabetes mellitus, atherogenic dyslipidemia, eyelid xanthelasma, arterial hypertension, cardiovascular disease, hepatic steatosis, acanthosis nigricans on axilla and neck, hirsutism, and muscular hypertrophy of the lower limbs. Caused by heterozygous mutation in the PPARG gene on chromosome 3p25. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
328393
Concept ID:
C1720861
Disease or Syndrome
8.

ALG9 congenital disorder of glycosylation

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) that represent defects of dolichol-linked oligosaccharide assembly are classified as CDG type I. For a general description and a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
443955
Concept ID:
C2931006
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Dilated cardiomyopathy-hypergonadotropic hypogonadism syndrome

This syndrome is characterized by the association of dilated cardiomyopathy and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (DCM-HH). [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
162901
Concept ID:
C0796031
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 3

Congenital generalized lipodystrophy, also known as Berardinelli-Seip syndrome, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by marked paucity of adipose tissue, extreme insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, and early onset of diabetes (Garg, 2004). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital generalized lipodystrophy, see CGL1 (608594). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
436541
Concept ID:
C2675861
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Stiff skin syndrome

Stiff skin syndrome (SSKS) is characterized by hard, thick skin, usually over the entire body, which limits joint mobility and causes flexion contractures. Other occasional findings include lipodystrophy and muscle weakness (Loeys et al., 2010). Patients with similar phenotypes involving stiff skin have been described; see, e.g., familial progressive scleroderma (181750), symmetric lipomatosis (151800), and congenital fascial dystrophy (228020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
348877
Concept ID:
C1861456
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4

Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4 (CGL4) combines the phenotype of classic Berardinelli-Seip lipodystrophy (608594) with muscular dystrophy and cardiac conduction anomalies (Hayashi et al., 2009). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital generalized lipodystrophy, see CGL1 (608594). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
412871
Concept ID:
C2750069
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Mandibular hypoplasia-deafness-progeroid syndrome

Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome (MDPL) is an autosomal dominant systemic disorder characterized by prominent loss of subcutaneous fat, a characteristic facial appearance, and metabolic abnormalities including insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. Sensorineural deafness occurs late in the first or second decades of life (summary by Weedon et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
811623
Concept ID:
C3715192
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Analbuminemia

Analbuminemia (ANALBA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifested by the presence of a very low amount of circulating serum albumin. Affected individuals have few clinical symptoms other than mild edema, hypotension, fatigue, and occasionally a peculiar lower body lipodystrophy (mainly in adult females). The most common biochemical finding is a gross hyperlipidemia, with a significant increase in the total and LDL cholesterol concentrations, but normal concentrations of HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Analbuminemia often leads to fetal or neonatal death in sibs in families of analbuminemic individuals, which may explain the rarity of the trait (summary by Caridi et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
164210
Concept ID:
C0878666
Finding
15.

Growth delay due to insulin-like growth factor I resistance

Patients with mutations in the receptor for insulin-like growth factor I show intrauterine growth retardation and postnatal growth failure, resulting in short stature and microcephaly. Other features may include delayed bone age, developmental delay, and dysmorphic features. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
338622
Concept ID:
C1849157
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Partial lipodystrophy, congenital cataracts, and neurodegeneration syndrome

Lipodystrophies are rare disorders characterized by loss of body fat from various regions and predisposition to metabolic complications of insulin resistance and lipid abnormalities. FPLD7 is an autosomal dominant disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Additional features, including early-onset cataracts and later onset of spasticity of the lower limbs, have been noted in some patients (summary by Garg et al., 2015). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), see 151660. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
813897
Concept ID:
C3807567
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 1

Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome-1 (PRAAS1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early childhood onset of annular erythematous plaques on the face and extremities with subsequent development of partial lipodystrophy and laboratory evidence of immune dysregulation. More variable features include recurrent fever, severe joint contractures, muscle weakness and atrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, basal ganglia calcifications, and microcytic anemia (summary by Agarwal et al., 2010; Kitamura et al., 2011; Arima et al., 2011). This disorder encompasses Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome (NKJO); joint contractures, muscular atrophy, microcytic anemia, and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy (JMP syndrome); and chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature syndrome (CANDLE). Among Japanese patients, this disorder is best described as Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, since both Nakajo (1939) and Nishimura et al. (1950) contributed to the original phenotypic descriptions. Genetic Heterogeneity of Proteasome-Associated Autoinflammatory Syndrome See also PRAAS2 (618048), caused by mutation in the POMP gene (613386) on chromosome 13q12; PRAAS3 (617591), caused by mutation in the PSMB4 gene (602177) on chromosome 1q21; PRAAS4 (619183), caused by mutation in the PSMG2 gene (609702) on chromosome 18p11; PRAAS5 (619175), caused by mutation in the PSMB10 gene (176847) on chromosome 16q22; and PRAAS6 (620796), caused by mutation in the PSMB9 gene (177045) on chromosome 6p21. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648310
Concept ID:
C4746851
Disease or Syndrome
18.

LIPE-related familial partial lipodystrophy

Familial partial lipodystrophy type 6 (FPLD6) is characterized by abnormal subcutaneous fat distribution, with variable excess accumulation of fat in the face, neck, shoulders, axillae, back, abdomen, and pubic region, and reduction in subcutaneous fat of the lower extremities. Progressive adult-onset myopathy is seen in some patients, and there is variable association with diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and hepatic steatosis (Zolotov et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), see 151660. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
863306
Concept ID:
C4014869
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Barber-Say syndrome

Barber-Say syndrome (BBRSAY) is a rare congenital condition characterized by severe hypertrichosis, especially of the back, skin abnormalities such as hyperlaxity and redundancy, and facial dysmorphism, including macrostomia, eyelid deformities, ocular telecanthus, abnormal and low-set ears, bulbous nasal tip with hypoplastic alae nasi, and low frontal hairline (summary by Roche et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
230818
Concept ID:
C1319466
Disease or Syndrome
20.

PLIN1-related familial partial lipodystrophy

Familial partial lipodystrophy type 4 is an autosomal dominant metabolic disorder characterized by childhood or young adult onset of loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue primarily affecting the lower limbs, insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension (summary by Gandotra et al., 2011). Other features may include hepatic steatosis, acanthosis nigricans, polycystic ovary syndrome, and renal disease (summary by Chen et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), see 151660. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1675945
Concept ID:
C5191005
Disease or Syndrome
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