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1.

PMM2-congenital disorder of glycosylation

PMM2-CDG, the most common of a group of disorders of abnormal glycosylation of N-linked oligosaccharides, is divided into three clinical stages: infantile multisystem, late-infantile and childhood ataxia–intellectual disability, and adult stable disability. The clinical manifestations and course are highly variable, ranging from infants who die in the first year of life to mildly affected adults. Clinical findings tend to be similar in sibs. In the infantile multisystem presentation, infants show axial hypotonia, hyporeflexia, esotropia, and developmental delay. Feeding problems, vomiting, faltering growth, and developmental delay are frequently seen. Subcutaneous fat may be excessive over the buttocks and suprapubic region. Two distinct clinical courses are observed: (1) a nonfatal neurologic course with faltering growth, strabismus, developmental delay, cerebellar hypoplasia, and hepatopathy in infancy followed by neuropathy and retinitis pigmentosa in the first or second decade; and (2) a more severe neurologic-multivisceral course with approximately 20% mortality in the first year of life. The late-infantile and childhood ataxia–intellectual disability stage, which begins between ages three and ten years, is characterized by hypotonia, ataxia, severely delayed language and motor development, inability to walk, and IQ of 40 to 70; other findings include seizures, stroke-like episodes or transient unilateral loss of function, coagulopathy, retinitis pigmentosa, joint contractures, and skeletal deformities. In the adult stable disability stage, intellectual ability is stable; peripheral neuropathy is variable, progressive retinitis pigmentosa and myopia are seen, thoracic and spinal deformities with osteoporosis worsen, and premature aging is observed; females may lack secondary sexual development and males may exhibit decreased testicular volume. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and coagulopathy may occur. The risk for deep venous thrombosis is increased. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
138111
Concept ID:
C0349653
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Osteogenesis imperfecta, perinatal lethal

COL1A1/2 osteogenesis imperfecta (COL1A1/2-OI) is characterized by fractures with minimal or absent trauma, variable dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI), and, in adult years, hearing loss. The clinical features of COL1A1/2-OI represent a continuum ranging from perinatal lethality to individuals with severe skeletal deformities, mobility impairments, and very short stature to nearly asymptomatic individuals with a mild predisposition to fractures, normal dentition, normal stature, and normal life span. Fractures can occur in any bone but are most common in the extremities. DI is characterized by gray or brown teeth that may appear translucent, wear down, and break easily. COL1A1/2-OI has been classified into four types based on clinical presentation and radiographic findings. This classification system can be helpful in providing information about prognosis and management for a given individual. The four more common OI types are now referred to as follows: Classic non-deforming OI with blue sclerae (previously OI type I). Perinatally lethal OI (previously OI type II). Progressively deforming OI (previously OI type III). Common variable OI with normal sclerae (previously OI type IV). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75673
Concept ID:
C0268358
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
3.

Pyruvate kinase deficiency of red cells

Red cell pyruvate kinase deficiency is the most common cause of hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. PK deficiency is also the most frequent enzyme abnormality of the glycolytic pathway (Zanella et al., 2005). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
473069
Concept ID:
C0340968
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Combined deficiency of sialidase AND beta galactosidase

Galactosialidosis (GSL) is a lysosomal storage disease associated with a combined deficiency of beta-galactosidase (611458) and neuraminidase (608272), secondary to a defect in protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). All patients have clinical manifestations typical of a lysosomal disorder, such as coarse facies, cherry red spots, vertebral changes, foam cells in the bone marrow, and vacuolated lymphocytes. Three phenotypic subtypes are recognized. The early infantile form is associated with fetal hydrops, edema, ascites, visceromegaly, skeletal dysplasia, and early death. The late infantile type is characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, growth retardation, cardiac involvement, and rare occurrence of neurologic signs. The juvenile/adult form is characterized by myoclonus, ataxia, angiokeratoma, mental retardation, neurologic deterioration, absence of visceromegaly, and long survival. The majority of reported patients belong to the juvenile/adult group and are mainly of Japanese origin (summary by d'Azzo et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82779
Concept ID:
C0268233
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Fetal akinesia deformation sequence 1

Decreased fetal activity associated with multiple joint contractures, facial anomalies and pulmonary hypoplasia. Ultrasound examination may reveal polyhydramnios, ankylosis, scalp edema, and decreased chest movements (reflecting pulmonary hypoplasia). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
220903
Concept ID:
C1276035
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Gaucher disease perinatal lethal

Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
374996
Concept ID:
C1842704
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Long QT syndrome 3

Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the EKG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
349087
Concept ID:
C1859062
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Distichiasis-lymphedema syndrome

Lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (referred to as LDS in this GeneReview) is characterized by lower-limb lymphedema, and distichiasis (aberrant eyelashes ranging from a full set of extra eyelashes to a single hair). Lymphedema typically appears in late childhood or puberty, is confined to the lower limbs with or without involvement of the external genitalia, and is often asymmetric; severity varies within families. Males develop edema at an earlier age and have more problems with cellulitis than females. Distichiasis, which may be present at birth, is observed in 94% of affected individuals. About 75% of affected individuals have ocular findings including corneal irritation, recurrent conjunctivitis, and photophobia; other common findings include varicose veins and ptosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75566
Concept ID:
C0265345
Disease or Syndrome
9.

ALG1-congenital disorder of glycosylation

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) comprise a group of multisystem diseases with mostly severe psychomotor and mental retardation. Type I CDG comprises those disorders in which there are defects that affect biosynthesis of dolichol-linked oligosaccharides in the cytosol or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as well as defects involving the transfer of oligosaccharides onto nascent glycoproteins. Type II CDG comprises all defects of further trimming and elongation of N-linked oligosaccharides in the ER and Golgi (Schwarz et al., 2004). CDG1K is a type I CDG characterized by predominant neurologic involvement. Survival ranges from the second day of life to adulthood. The liver is affected in a minority of patients and shows hepatomegaly, edema, ascites, cholestatic jaundice, portal hypertension, and Budd-Chiari syndrome (summary by Marques-da-Silva et al., 2017). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
419308
Concept ID:
C2931005
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Alveolar capillary dysplasia with pulmonary venous misalignment

Congenital alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACDMPV) is characterized histologically by failure of formation and ingrowth of alveolar capillaries that then do not make contact with alveolar epithelium, medial muscular thickening of small pulmonary arterioles with muscularization of the intraacinar arterioles, thickened alveolar walls, and anomalously situated pulmonary veins running alongside pulmonary arterioles and sharing the same adventitial sheath. Less common features include a reduced number of alveoli and a patchy distribution of the histopathologic changes. The disorder is associated with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate and shows varying degrees of lability and severity (Boggs et al., 1994). Affected infants present with respiratory distress resulting from pulmonary hypertension in the early postnatal period, and the disease is uniformly fatal within the newborn period (Vassal et al., 1998). Additional features of ACDMPV include multiple congenital anomalies affecting the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and musculoskeletal systems, as well as disruption of the normal right-left asymmetry of intrathoracic or intraabdominal organs (Sen et al., 2004). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
755478
Concept ID:
C2960310
Congenital Abnormality
11.

Hereditary lymphedema type I

Primary lymphedema is caused by anatomic or functional defects in the lymphatic system, resulting in chronic swelling of body parts. There may be accompanying nail and skin changes, such as nail dysplasia or papillomatosis. Onset is usually at birth or in early childhood but can occur later, and the severity is variable (summary by Gordon et al., 2013 and Balboa-Beltran et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Lymphatic Malformation Primary lymphedema is genetically heterogeneous: see also LMPHM2 (611944), which maps to chromosome 6q16.2-q22.1; LMPHM3 (613480), caused by mutation in the GJC2 gene (608803) on chromosome 1q42; LMPHM4 (615907), caused by mutation in the VEGFC gene (601528) on chromosome 4q34; LMPHM5 (153200); LMPHM6 (616843), caused by mutation in the PIEZO1 gene (611184) on chromosome 16q24; LMPHM7 (617300), caused by mutation in the EPHB4 gene (600011) on chromosome 7q22; LMPHM8 (618773), caused by mutation in the CALCRL gene (114190) on chromosome 2q31; LMPHM9 (619319), caused by mutation in the CELSR1 gene (604523) on chromosome 22q13; LMPHM10 (610369), caused by mutation in the ANGPT2 gene (601922) on chromosome 8p23; LMPHM11 (619401), caused by mutation in the TIE1 gene (600222) on chromosome 1p34; LMPHM12 (620014), caused by mutation in the MDFIC gene (614511) on chromosome 7q31; LMPHM13 (620244), caused by mutation in the THSD1 gene (616821) on chromosome 13q14; and LMPHM14 (620602), caused by mutation in the ERG gene (165080) on chromosome 21q22. Lymphedema can also be a feature of syndromic disorders such as lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (153400), which is caused by mutation in the FOXC2 gene (602402), and various forms of nonimmune hydrops fetalis (NIHF; see 236750). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
309963
Concept ID:
C1704423
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Hennekam lymphangiectasia-lymphedema syndrome 1

Hennekam lymphangiectasia-lymphedema syndrome (HKLLS1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by generalized lymphatic dysplasia affecting various organs, including the intestinal tract, pericardium, and limbs. Additional features of the disorder include facial dysmorphism and cognitive impairment (summary by Alders et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Hennekam Lymphangiectasia-Lymphedema Syndrome See also HKLLS2 (616006), caused by mutation in the FAT4 gene (612411) on chromosome 4q28, and HKLLS3 (618154), caused by mutation in the ADAMTS3 gene (605011) on chromosome 4q13. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
860487
Concept ID:
C4012050
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Greenberg dysplasia

Greenberg dysplasia (GRBGD), also known as hydrops-ectopic calcification-moth-eaten (HEM) skeletal dysplasia, is a rare autosomal recessive osteochondrodysplasia characterized by gross fetal hydrops, severe shortening of all long bones with a moth-eaten radiographic appearance, platyspondyly, disorganization of chondroosseous calcification, and ectopic ossification centers. It is lethal in utero. Patient fibroblasts show increased levels of cholesta-8,14-dien-3-beta-ol, suggesting a defect of sterol metabolism (summary by Konstantinidou et al., 2008). Herman (2003) reviewed the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway and 6 disorders involving enzyme defects in postsqualene cholesterol biosynthesis: Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS; 270400), desmosterolosis (602398), X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2; 302960), CHILD syndrome (308050), lathosterolosis (607330), and HEM skeletal dysplasia. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
418969
Concept ID:
C2931048
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Noonan syndrome 2

Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
344290
Concept ID:
C1854469
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Schneckenbecken dysplasia

Schneckenbecken dysplasia (SHNKND) is a perinatally lethal skeletal dysplasia. The German term 'Schneckenbecken' refers to the distinctive, snail-like appearance of the ilia that results from a medial bone projection from the inner iliac margin. Other hallmarks of the disorder include thoracic hypoplasia, severe flattening of the vertebral bodies, and short, thick long bones (summary by Hiraoka et al., 2007). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
98475
Concept ID:
C0432194
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic, 5

Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis-5 (PFIC5) is an autosomal recessive severe liver disorder characterized by onset of intralobular cholestasis in the neonatal period. The disease is rapidly progressive, leading to liver failure and death if liver transplant is not performed. Other features include abnormal liver enzymes, low to normal gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity, increased alpha-fetoprotein, and a vitamin K-independent coagulopathy (summary by Gomez-Ospina et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PFIC, see PFIC1 (211600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934714
Concept ID:
C4310747
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Fraser syndrome 3

Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive malformation disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and abnormalities of the respiratory and urogenital tract (summary by van Haelst et al., 2008). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Fraser syndrome, see 219000. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1621907
Concept ID:
C4540040
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Non-immune hydrops fetalis

Hydrops fetalis is a descriptive term for generalized edema of the fetus, with fluid accumulation in extravascular components and body cavities. It is not a diagnosis in itself, but a symptom and end-stage result of a wide variety of disorders. In the case of immune hydrops fetalis, a frequent cause is maternofetal incompatibility as in that related to a number of genetic anemias and metabolic disorders expressed in the fetus; in other instances, it remains idiopathic and likely multifactorial (summary by Bellini et al., 2009). Nonimmune hydrops fetalis accounts for 76 to 87% of all described cases of hydrops fetalis (Bellini et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Hydrops Fetalis In southeast Asia, alpha-thalassemia (604131) is the most common cause of hydrops fetalis, accounting for 60 to 90% of cases. Almost all of these cases result from homozygous deletion of the HBA1 (141800) and HBA2 (141850) genes. A few cases have been reported that had 1 apparently normal alpha-globin gene, termed the hemoglobin H (613978) hydrops fetalis syndrome (summary by Chui and Waye, 1998). Other genetic disorders predisposing to NIHF include other congenital anemias, such as erythropoietic porphyria (e.g., 606938.0013), and many metabolic disorders, such as one form of Gaucher disease (e.g., 606463.0009), infantile sialic acid storage disease (269920), mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (253220), glycogen storage disease IV (232500), congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia (212065), and disorders of lymphatic malformation (see, e.g., LMPHM1, 153100). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
105327
Concept ID:
C0455988
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Hypotrichosis-lymphedema-telangiectasia syndrome

Hypotrichosis-lymphedema-telangiectasia syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by these 3 features, which begin at birth or in early childhood and are progressive (summary by Irrthum et al., 2003). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
375070
Concept ID:
C1843004
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Hydrops-lactic acidosis-sideroblastic anemia-multisystemic failure syndrome

Hydrops, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia (HLASA) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by the onset of hydrops in utero. The severity of the hydrops and the disorder in general is highly variable. At birth, affected infants usually show poor growth, lactic acidosis, pulmonary hypertension with hypoxic respiratory insufficiency, and sideroblastic anemia. More variable features may include hepatosplenomegaly or cholestasis, hypoglycemia, pancreatic insufficiency, and micropenis or hypospadias. Death in infancy may occur. Those who survive tend to have resolution of lactic acidosis and anemia, but may show developmental delay and sensorineural deafness (summary by Riley et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934728
Concept ID:
C4310761
Disease or Syndrome
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