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1.

Fanconi-Bickel syndrome

Fanconi-Bickel syndrome is a rare but well-defined clinical entity, inherited in an autosomal recessive mode and characterized by hepatorenal glycogen accumulation, proximal renal tubular dysfunction, and impaired utilization of glucose and galactose (Manz et al., 1987). Because no underlying enzymatic defect in carbohydrate metabolism had been identified and because metabolism of both glucose and galactose is impaired, a primary defect of monosaccharide transport across the membranes had been suggested (Berry et al., 1995; Fellers et al., 1967; Manz et al., 1987; Odievre, 1966). Use of the term glycogenosis type XI introduced by Hug (1987) is to be discouraged because glycogen accumulation is not due to the proposed functional defect of phosphoglucomutase, an essential enzyme in the common degradative pathways of both glycogen and galactose, but is secondary to nonfunctional glucose transport. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
501176
Concept ID:
C3495427
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Leprechaunism syndrome

INSR-related severe syndromic insulin resistance comprises a phenotypic spectrum that is a continuum from the severe phenotype Donohue syndrome (DS) (also known as leprechaunism) to the milder phenotype Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome (RMS). DS at the severe end of the spectrum is characterized by severe insulin resistance (hyperinsulinemia with associated fasting hypoglycemia and postprandial hyperglycemia), severe prenatal growth restriction and postnatal growth failure, hypotonia and developmental delay, characteristic facies, and organomegaly involving heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, and ovaries. Death usually occurs before age one year. RMS at the milder end of the spectrum is characterized by severe insulin resistance that, although not as severe as that of DS, is nonetheless accompanied by fluctuations in blood glucose levels, diabetic ketoacidosis, and – in the second decade – microvascular complications. Findings can range from severe growth delay and intellectual disability to normal growth and development. Facial features can be milder than those of DS. Complications of longstanding hyperglycemia are the most common cause of death. While death usually occurs in the second decade, some affected individuals live longer. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
82708
Concept ID:
C0265344
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Glycogen storage disorder due to hepatic glycogen synthase deficiency

Glycogen storage disease type 0 (also known as GSD 0) is a condition caused by the body's inability to form a complex sugar called glycogen, which is a major source of stored energy in the body. GSD 0 has two types: in muscle GSD 0, glycogen formation in the muscles is impaired, and in liver GSD 0, glycogen formation in the liver is impaired.

Individuals with liver GSD 0 usually show signs and symptoms of the disorder in infancy. People with this disorder develop low blood sugar (glucose), known as hypoglycemia, after going long periods of time without food (fasting). Signs of hypoglycemia become apparent when affected infants begin sleeping through the night and stop late-night feedings; these infants exhibit extreme tiredness (lethargy), pale skin (pallor), and nausea. During episodes of fasting, ketone levels in the blood may increase (ketosis). Ketones are molecules produced during the breakdown of fats, which occurs when stored sugars (such as glycogen) are unavailable. These short-term signs and symptoms of liver GSD 0 often improve when food is eaten and glucose levels in the body return to normal. The features of liver GSD 0 vary; they can be mild and go unnoticed for years, or they can include developmental delay and growth failure.

The signs and symptoms of muscle GSD 0 typically begin in early childhood. Affected individuals often experience muscle pain and weakness or episodes of fainting (syncope) following moderate physical activity, such as walking up stairs. The loss of consciousness that occurs with fainting typically lasts up to several hours. Some individuals with muscle GSD 0 have a disruption of the heart's normal rhythm (arrhythmia) known as long QT syndrome. In all affected individuals, muscle GSD 0 impairs the heart's ability to effectively pump blood and increases the risk of cardiac arrest and sudden death, particularly after physical activity. Sudden death from cardiac arrest can occur in childhood or adolescence in people with muscle GSD 0. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
343430
Concept ID:
C1855861
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome

INSR-related severe syndromic insulin resistance comprises a phenotypic spectrum that is a continuum from the severe phenotype Donohue syndrome (DS) (also known as leprechaunism) to the milder phenotype Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome (RMS). DS at the severe end of the spectrum is characterized by severe insulin resistance (hyperinsulinemia with associated fasting hypoglycemia and postprandial hyperglycemia), severe prenatal growth restriction and postnatal growth failure, hypotonia and developmental delay, characteristic facies, and organomegaly involving heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, and ovaries. Death usually occurs before age one year. RMS at the milder end of the spectrum is characterized by severe insulin resistance that, although not as severe as that of DS, is nonetheless accompanied by fluctuations in blood glucose levels, diabetic ketoacidosis, and – in the second decade – microvascular complications. Findings can range from severe growth delay and intellectual disability to normal growth and development. Facial features can be milder than those of DS. Complications of longstanding hyperglycemia are the most common cause of death. While death usually occurs in the second decade, some affected individuals live longer. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78783
Concept ID:
C0271695
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Postprandial hyperglycemia

An increased concentration of glucose in the blood following a meal. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
383702
Concept ID:
C1855520
Finding
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