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1.

Landau-Kleffner syndrome

GRIN2A-related speech disorders and epilepsy are characterized by speech disorders in all affected individuals and a range of epilepsy syndromes present in about 90%. Severe speech disorders observed can include dysarthria and speech dyspraxia, and both receptive and expressive language delay/regression; more mildly affected individuals may display subtly impaired intelligibility of conversational speech. Epilepsy features include seizure onset usually between ages three and six years, focal epilepsy with language and/or global developmental regression, and electroencephalogram (EEG) showing continuous spike-and-wave discharges in sleep or very active centrotemporal discharges. Seizure types include seizures associated with aura of perioral paresthesia, focal or focal motor seizures (often evolving to generalized tonic-clonic), and atypical absence seizures. Epilepsy syndromes can include: Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-wave during sleep (ECSWS), childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (CECTS), atypical childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (ACECTS), autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy with speech dyspraxia (ADRESD), and infantile-onset epileptic encephalopathy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
79465
Concept ID:
C0282512
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Microcephaly 1, primary, autosomal recessive

Primary microcephaly refers to the clinical finding of a head circumference more than than 3 standard deviations (SD) below the age- and sex-related mean, present at birth. Primary microcephaly is a static developmental anomaly, distinguished from secondary microcephaly, which refers to a progressive neurodegenerative condition. Microcephaly is a disorder of fetal brain growth; individuals with microcephaly have small brains and almost always have mental retardation, although rare individuals with mild microcephaly (-3 SD) and normal intelligence have been reported. Additional clinical features may include short stature or mild seizures. MCPH is associated with a simplification of the cerebral cortical gyral pattern and a slight reduction in the volume of the white matter, consistent with the small size of the brain, but the architecture of the brain in general is normal, with no evidence of a neuronal migration defect (review by Woods et al., 2005). Most cases of primary microcephaly show an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Because MCPH directly affects neurogenesis, or neurogenic mitosis, rather than growth of the skull, some prefer the term 'micrencephaly' (Hofman, 1984). MCPH1 in particular is associated with premature chromosome condensation in cell studies (Darvish et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Primary Microcephaly Primary microcephaly is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. See MCPH2 (604317), caused by mutation in the WDR62 gene (613583) on chromosome 19q13; MCPH3 (604804), caused by mutation in the CDK5RAP2 gene (608201) on 9q33; MCPH4 (604321), caused by mutation in the CASC5 gene (609173) on 15q14; MCPH5 (608716), caused by mutation in the ASPM gene (605481) on 1q31; MCPH6 (608393), caused by mutation in the CENPJ gene (609279) on 13q12; MCPH7 (612703), caused by mutation in the STIL gene (181590) on 1p33; MCPH8 (614673), caused by mutation in the CEP135 gene (611423) on 4q12; MCPH9 (614852), caused by mutation in the CEP152 gene (613529) on 15q21; MCPH10 (615095), caused by mutation in the ZNF335 gene (610827) on 20q13; MCPH11 (615414), caused by mutation in the PHC1 gene (602978) on 12p13; MCPH12 (616080), caused by mutation in the CDK6 gene (603368) on 7q21; MCPH13 (616051), caused by mutation in the CENPE gene (117143) on 4q24; MCPH14 (616402), caused by mutation in the SASS6 gene (609321) on 1p21; MCPH15 (616486), caused by mutation in the MFSD2A gene (614397) on 1p34; MCPH16 (616681), caused by mutation in the ANKLE2 gene (616062) on 12q24; MCPH17 (617090), caused by mutation in the CIT gene (605629) on 12q24; MCPH18 (617520), caused by mutation in the WDFY3 gene (617485) on 4q21; MCPH19 (617800), caused by mutation in the COPB2 gene (606990) on 3q23; MCPH20 (617914), caused by mutation in the KIF14 gene (611279) on 1q31; MCPH21 (617983), caused by mutation in the NCAPD2 gene (615638) on 12p13; MCPH22 (617984), caused by mutation in the NCAPD3 gene (609276) on 11q25; MCPH23 (617985), caused by mutation in the NCAPH gene (602332) on 2q11; MCPH24 (618179), caused by mutation in the NUP37 gene (609264) on 12q23; MCPH25 (618351), caused by mutation in the MAP11 gene (618350) on 7q22; MCPH26 (619179), caused by mutation in the LMNB1 gene (150340) on 5q23; MCPH27 (619180), caused by mutation in the LMNB2 gene (150341) on 19p13; MCPH28 (619453), caused by mutation in the RRP7A gene (619449) on 22q13; MCPH29 (620047), caused by mutation in the PDCD6IP gene (608074) on 3p22; and MCPH30 (620183), caused by mutation in the BUB1 gene (602452) on 2q14. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
344415
Concept ID:
C1855081
Disease or Syndrome
3.

PHGDH deficiency

Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency (PHGDHD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of L-serine biosynthesis that is characterized by congenital microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, and seizures (summary by Jaeken et al., 1996). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
400935
Concept ID:
C1866174
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Neu-Laxova syndrome 1

Any Neu-Laxova syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PHGDH gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
1633287
Concept ID:
C4551478
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Cornelia de Lange syndrome 3

Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
339902
Concept ID:
C1853099
Disease or Syndrome
6.

COG7 congenital disorder of glycosylation

CDG IIe is caused by a mutation that impairs the integrity of the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex and alters Golgi trafficking, resulting in the disruption of multiple glycosylation pathways. For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
419311
Concept ID:
C2931010
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Congenital microcephaly - severe encephalopathy - progressive cerebral atrophy syndrome

Asparagine synthetase deficiency (ASD) mainly presents as a triad of congenital microcephaly, severe developmental delay, and axial hypotonia followed by spastic quadriplegia. Low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine level can help the clinician in differentiating this disorder from others. In most cases age of onset of apnea, excessive irritability, and seizures is soon after birth. Affected individuals typically do not acquire any developmental milestones. Spastic quadriplegia can lead to severe contractures of the limbs and neurogenic scoliosis. Feeding difficulties (gastroesophageal reflux disease, frequent vomiting, swallowing dysfunction, and gastroesophageal incoordination) are a significant problem in most affected individuals. A majority have cortical blindness. MRI findings are nonspecific but may include generalized atrophy and simplified gyral pattern. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
816301
Concept ID:
C3809971
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Amish lethal microcephaly

Amish lethal microcephaly is characterized by severe congenital microcephaly and highly elevated 2-ketoglutarate or lactic acidosis. The occipitofrontal circumference is typically more than two standard deviations (occasionally >6 SD) below the mean; anterior and posterior fontanels are closed at birth and facial features are distorted. The average life span of an affected infant is between five and six months among the Lancaster Amish, although an affected Amish-Mennonite child was reported to be living with severe developmental delay at age seven years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
375938
Concept ID:
C1846648
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 7

Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
854829
Concept ID:
C3888244
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Lissencephaly 4

Lissencephaly-4 (LIS4) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by lissencephaly, severe brain atrophy, extreme microcephaly (head circumference of more than 10 standard deviations (SD) below the mean), and profound mental retardation. It has also been referred to as 'microlissencephaly' (summary by Bakircioglu et al., 2011 and Alkuraya et al., 2011). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462811
Concept ID:
C3151461
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Microcephaly 3, primary, autosomal recessive

People with MCPH usually have few or no other features associated with the condition. Some have a narrow, sloping forehead; mild seizures; problems with attention or behavior; or short stature compared to others in their family. The condition typically does not affect any other major organ systems or cause other health problems.

MCPH causes intellectual disability, which is typically mild to moderate and does not become more severe with age. Most affected individuals have delayed speech and language skills. Motor skills, such as sitting, standing, and walking, may also be mildly delayed.

Infants with MCPH have an unusually small head circumference compared to other infants of the same sex and age. Head circumference is the distance around the widest part of the head, measured by placing a measuring tape above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head. Affected infants' brain volume is also smaller than usual, although they usually do not have any major abnormalities in the structure of the brain. The head and brain grow throughout childhood and adolescence, but they continue to be much smaller than normal.

Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (often shortened to MCPH, which stands for "microcephaly primary hereditary") is a condition in which infants are born with a very small head and a small brain. The term "microcephaly" comes from the Greek words for "small head." [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
347619
Concept ID:
C1858108
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Microcephaly 7, primary, autosomal recessive

Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (often shortened to MCPH, which stands for "microcephaly primary hereditary") is a condition in which infants are born with a very small head and a small brain. The term "microcephaly" comes from the Greek words for "small head."

Infants with MCPH have an unusually small head circumference compared to other infants of the same sex and age. Head circumference is the distance around the widest part of the head, measured by placing a measuring tape above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head. Affected infants' brain volume is also smaller than usual, although they usually do not have any major abnormalities in the structure of the brain. The head and brain grow throughout childhood and adolescence, but they continue to be much smaller than normal.

MCPH causes intellectual disability, which is typically mild to moderate and does not become more severe with age. Most affected individuals have delayed speech and language skills. Motor skills, such as sitting, standing, and walking, may also be mildly delayed.

People with MCPH usually have few or no other features associated with the condition. Some have a narrow, sloping forehead; mild seizures; problems with attention or behavior; or short stature compared to others in their family. The condition typically does not affect any other major organ systems or cause other health problems. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
436370
Concept ID:
C2675187
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 39

Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-39 with leukodystrophy (DEE39) is an autosomal recessive neurologic syndrome characterized clinically by global developmental delay apparent in early infancy, early-onset seizures, hypotonia with poor motor function, and hypomyelination on brain imaging. Other features include absent speech and inability to walk; spasticity and hyperreflexia has also been reported. Although there is significant hypomyelination on brain imaging, the disorder was not classified as a primary leukodystrophy. The myelination defect was thought to stem from primary neuronal dysfunction due to impaired mitochondrial transport activity (summary by Wibom et al., 2009 and Falk et al., 2014). However, serial brain imaging in a patient with DEE39 by Kavanaugh et al. (2019) suggested that the mechanism of disease is consistent with a leukoaxonopathy type of leukodystrophy. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
414492
Concept ID:
C2751855
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Seckel syndrome 2

Seckel syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by growth retardation, microcephaly with mental retardation, and a characteristic facial appearance (Borglum et al., 2001). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Seckel syndrome, see SCKL1 (210600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
338264
Concept ID:
C1847572
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Severe intellectual disability-progressive spastic diplegia syndrome

CTNNB1 neurodevelopmental disorder (CTNNB1-NDD) is characterized in all individuals by mild-to-profound cognitive impairment and in up to 39% of reported individuals by exudative vitreoretinopathy, an ophthalmologic finding consistent with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR). Other common findings include truncal hypotonia, peripheral spasticity, dystonia, behavior problems, microcephaly, and refractive errors and strabismus. Less common features include intrauterine growth restriction, feeding difficulties, and scoliosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
767363
Concept ID:
C3554449
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Seckel syndrome 6

Any Seckel syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CEP63 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
766496
Concept ID:
C3553582
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Jawad syndrome

Jawad syndrome (JWDS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital microcephaly, moderate to severely impaired intellectual development, and digital malformations including phalangeal joint swelling, clinodactyly, polydactyly, syndactyly, and total absence of nails (summary by Qvist et al., 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
810673
Concept ID:
C0796063
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Microcephaly 8, primary, autosomal recessive

Any autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CEP135 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
766328
Concept ID:
C3553414
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Microcephaly 4, primary, autosomal recessive

Primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a clinical diagnosis made when an individual has a head circumference more than 3 standard deviations below the age- and sex-matched population mean and mental retardation, with no other associated malformations and with no apparent etiology. Most cases of primary microcephaly show an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance (summary by Woods et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of primary microcephaly, see MCPH1 (251200). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
347655
Concept ID:
C1858516
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Pontocerebellar hypoplasia, type 12

MedGen UID:
1648343
Concept ID:
C4748873
Disease or Syndrome
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