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Items: 5

1.

Fanconi anemia complementation group Q

Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and/or lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
815318
Concept ID:
C3808988
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Atrioventricular septal defect 4

The term 'atrioventricular septal defect' (AVSD) covers a spectrum of congenital heart malformations characterized by a common atrioventricular junction coexisting with deficient atrioventricular septation. In ostium primum atrial septal defect (ASD) there are separate atrioventricular valvar orifices despite a common junction, whereas in complete AVSD the valve itself is also shared (summary by Craig, 2006). AVSD, also designated endocardial cushion defect or atrioventricular canal defect (AVCD), is known to occur in either a nonsyndromic (isolated) form or, more commonly, as part of a malformation syndrome. The 2 syndromes most frequently associated with AVSD are Down syndrome (190685), in which AVSD is the most frequent congenital heart defect, and Ivemark syndrome (208530) (summary by Carmi et al., 1992). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of atrioventricular septal defects, see AVSD1 (606215). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
482411
Concept ID:
C3280781
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
3.

Biliary, renal, neurologic, and skeletal syndrome

Biliary, renal, neurologic, and skeletal syndrome (BRENS) is an autosomal recessive complex ciliopathy with multisystemic manifestations. The most common presentation is severe neonatal cholestasis that progresses to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Most patients have additional clinical features suggestive of a ciliopathy, including postaxial polydactyly, hydrocephalus, retinal abnormalities, and situs inversus. Additional features of the syndrome may include congenital cardiac defects, echogenic kidneys with renal failure, ocular abnormalities, joint hyperextensibility, and dysmorphic facial features. Some patients have global developmental delay. Brain imaging typically shows dilated ventricles, hypomyelination, and white matter abnormalities, although some patients have been described with abnormal pituitary development (summary by Shaheen et al., 2020 and David et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1794200
Concept ID:
C5561990
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Heterotaxy, visceral, 11, autosomal, with male infertility

Visceral heterotaxy-11 (HTX11) is characterized by a failure to generate normal left-right visceral asymmetry during embryogenesis, which can result in heterotaxy syndrome or situs inversus totalis. Affected individuals may experience mild chronic respiratory symptoms, but do not fulfill the criteria for primary ciliary dyskinesia (see 244400). Male infertility associated with reduced flagellar motility has been reported (Dougherty et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of visceral heterotaxy, see HTX1 (306955). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1794229
Concept ID:
C5562019
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Primum atrial septal defect

An ostium primum atrial septal defect is located in the most anterior and inferior aspect of the atrial septum. The ostium primum refers to an anterior and inferior opening (ostium) within the septum primum, which divides the rudimentary atrium during fetal development. The ostium primum is normally sealed by fusion of the superior and inferior endocardial cushions around 5 weeks' gestation. Ostium primum defects result from a failure of the fusion of the embryologic endocardial cushion and septum primum. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
83374
Concept ID:
C0344735
Congenital Abnormality
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