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1.

Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 1

POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+"). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
371919
Concept ID:
C1834846
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome

Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) is characterized by cerebellar ataxia with cerebellar atrophy, dysarthria, nystagmus, early-onset (not necessarily congenital) cataracts, myopathy, muscle weakness, and hypotonia. Additional features may include psychomotor delay, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, short stature, and various skeletal abnormalities. Children with MSS usually present with muscular hypotonia in early infancy; distal and proximal muscular weakness is noticed during the first decade of life. Later, cerebellar findings of truncal ataxia, dysdiadochokinesia, nystagmus, and dysarthria become apparent. Motor function worsens progressively for some years, then stabilizes at an unpredictable age and degree of severity. Cataracts can develop rapidly and typically require lens extraction in the first decade of life. Although many adults have severe disabilities, life span in MSS appears to be near normal. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
6222
Concept ID:
C0024814
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 6 (hepatocerebral type)

MPV17-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance defect presents in the vast majority of affected individuals as an early-onset encephalohepatopathic (hepatocerebral) disease that is typically associated with mtDNA depletion, particularly in the liver. A later-onset neuromyopathic disease characterized by myopathy and neuropathy, and associated with multiple mtDNA deletions in muscle, has also rarely been described. MPV17-related mtDNA maintenance defect, encephalohepatopathic form is characterized by: Hepatic manifestations (liver dysfunction that typically progresses to liver failure, cholestasis, hepatomegaly, and steatosis); Neurologic involvement (developmental delay, hypotonia, microcephaly, and motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy); Gastrointestinal manifestations (gastrointestinal dysmotility, feeding difficulties, and failure to thrive); and Metabolic derangements (lactic acidosis and hypoglycemia). Less frequent manifestations include renal tubulopathy, nephrocalcinosis, and hypoparathyroidism. Progressive liver disease often leads to death in infancy or early childhood. Hepatocellular carcinoma has been reported. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
338045
Concept ID:
C1850406
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Coenzyme Q10 deficiency, primary, 1

Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
764868
Concept ID:
C3551954
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 8

A neurodegenerative disease with characteristics of progressive muscular paralysis reflecting degeneration of motor neurons in the primary motor cortex, corticospinal tracts, brainstem and spinal cord. Caused by heterozygous mutation in the VAPB gene on chromosome 20q13. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
325237
Concept ID:
C1837728
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 3

Progressive external ophthalmoplegia is characterized by multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. The most common clinical features include adult onset of weakness of the external eye muscles and exercise intolerance. Patients with C10ORF2-linked adPEO may have other clinical features including proximal muscle weakness, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, cardiomyopathy, cataracts, depression, and endocrine abnormalities (summary by Fratter et al., 2010). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640). PEO caused by mutations in the POLG gene (174763) are associated with more complicated phenotypes than those forms caused by mutations in the SLC25A4 (103220) or C10ORF2 genes (Lamantea et al., 2002). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
373087
Concept ID:
C1836439
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Arts syndrome

Arts syndrome, which is part of the spectrum of PRPS1-related disorders, is characterized by profound congenital sensorineural hearing impairment, early-onset hypotonia, delayed motor development, mild to moderate intellectual disability, ataxia, and increased risk of infection, all of which – with the exception of optic atrophy – present before age two years. Signs of peripheral neuropathy develop during early childhood. Twelve of 15 boys from the two Dutch families reported with Arts syndrome died before age six years of complications of infection. Carrier females can show late-onset (age >20 years) hearing impairment and other findings. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
163205
Concept ID:
C0796028
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Myofibrillar myopathy 4

Myofibrillar myopathy-4 (MFM4) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by adult-onset distal muscle weakness primarily affecting the lower limbs at onset. Affected individuals usually present with gait difficulties in their forties, followed by slow progression with eventual involvement of the hands and proximal muscles of the lower limbs. Rare patients may develop cardiomyopathy. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows myopathic changes with myofibrillar changes (Selcen and Engel, 2005; Griggs et al., 2007). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648314
Concept ID:
C4721886
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia 1

Myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) is a rare autosomal recessive oxidative phosphorylation disorder specific to skeletal muscle and bone marrow (Bykhovskaya et al., 2004). Genetic Heterogeneity of Myopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Sideroblastic Anemia MLASA2 (613561) is caused by mutation in the YARS2 gene (610957) on chromosome 12p11. MLASA3 (500011) is caused by heteroplasmic mutation in the mitochondrially-encoded MTATP6 gene (516060). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1634824
Concept ID:
C4551958
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal dominant 4

Progressive external ophthalmoplegia-4 is an autosomal dominant form of mitochondrial disease that variably affects skeletal muscle, the nervous system, the liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Age at onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. The phenotype ranges from relatively mild, with adult-onset skeletal muscle weakness and weakness of the external eye muscles, to severe, with a multisystem disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, lactic acidosis, constipation, and liver involvement (summary by Young et al., 2011). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
350480
Concept ID:
C1864668
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2M

MDDGC4 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy with onset in infancy or early childhood. Cognition and brain structure are usually normal (Godfrey et al., 2006). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Mercuri et al., 2009). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
370585
Concept ID:
C1969040
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Triosephosphate isomerase deficiency

Triosephosphate isomerase deficiency (TPID) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by congenital hemolytic anemia, and progressive neuromuscular dysfunction beginning in early childhood. Many patients die from respiratory failure in childhood. The neurologic syndrome is variable, but usually includes lower motor neuron dysfunction with hypotonia, muscle weakness and atrophy, and hyporeflexia. Some patients may show additional signs such as dystonic posturing and/or spasticity. Laboratory studies show intracellular accumulation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), particularly in red blood cells (summary by Fermo et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
349893
Concept ID:
C1860808
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Nemaline myopathy 5

Autosomal recessive severe infantile nemaline myopathy-5A (NEM5A) is a skeletal muscle disorder characterized by symptom onset soon after birth or in early infancy. Affected infants show axial hypotonia, stiffness, rigid spine with progressive kyphosis, pectus deformities, and contractures or limited movement of the large joints. Some patients show transient tremors. There is muscle atrophy and poor gross motor development. Respiratory insufficiency develops in the first years of life, often leading to death. Muscle biopsy shows nemaline rods (Johnston et al., 2000; Geraud et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nemaline myopathy, see NEM2 (256030). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
344273
Concept ID:
C1854380
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 11B

The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX13 gene have cells of complementation group 13 (CG13, equivalent to CGH). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766915
Concept ID:
C3554001
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Multiple symmetric lipomatosis

Multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by the growth of unencapsulated masses of adipose tissue with predilection for the cervical and thoracic regions. The lipoma growth is striking and disfiguring, and growth around the neck may cause difficulty swallowing or breathing. The age at onset ranges from childhood to young adulthood. Most, but not all, patients develop axonal peripheral neuropathy, which can appear at any age and varies in severity. Laboratory studies in MSL show low leptin (164160), low adiponectin (605441), variably increased lactate, and increased FGF21 (609436). Some patients may have insulin resistance. The disorder is exclusively associated with a particular MFN2 mutation (R707W; 608507.0013), usually in the homozygous state, but sometimes in the compound heterozygous state (Rocha et al., 2017; Capel et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
7349
Concept ID:
C0023804
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Progressive scapulohumeroperoneal distal myopathy

Scapulohumeroperoneal myopathy is an autosomal dominant muscle disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy affecting both proximal and distal muscles of the upper and lower limbs. Onset is usually in the first decade and can be as early as infancy, although some patients do not notice symptoms until young adulthood. There is marked variability in severity (summary by Zukosky et al., 2015). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
905125
Concept ID:
C4225181
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder 2

Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder-2 is an autosomal recessive syndrome resulting from defects in DNA excision repair. Affected individuals have a neurodegenerative phenotype characterized by developmental delay, ataxia, and sensorineural hearing loss. Other features include short stature, cutaneous and ocular telangiectasia, and photosensitivity (summary by Baple et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ATLD, see ATLD1 (604391). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
863113
Concept ID:
C4014676
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Congenital myopathy 10b, mild variant

Congenital myopathy-10B (CMYP10B) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by infantile- or childhood-onset myopathy, areflexia, dysphagia, and respiratory distress that usually requires nocturnal ventilation. Other common features include facial and neck muscle weakness, feeding difficulties, contractures, scoliosis, high-arched palate, hyporeflexia, and difficulties walking. The disorder is slowly progressive and most patients follow a chronic course. Muscle biopsy shows variable findings, including type 1 fiber predominance, minicore lesions, and myofibrillar disorganization (Boyden et al., 2012; Harris et al., 2018). Patients with missense mutations affecting conserved cysteine residues in the EGF-like domain show the mild variant phenotype (CMYP10B) with later onset of respiratory failure and minicores on muscle biopsy, whereas patients with more damaging mutations, including nonsense or frameshift null mutations, show the severe variant phenotype (CMYP10A) (Croci et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
762102
Concept ID:
C3541476
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Muscular dystrophy, congenital, with or without seizures

Congenital muscular dystrophy with or without seizures (MYOS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe muscle hypotonia apparent from birth, as well as developmental delay. Laboratory studies show increased serum creatine kinase and muscle biopsy shows nonspecific dystrophic features. Most patients develop seizures or have abnormal epileptiform findings on EEG studies; other variable findings may include feeding difficulties, nystagmus, myopathic facies, areflexia, and brain atrophy on MRI (summary by Larson et al., 2018 and Henige et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1824047
Concept ID:
C5774274
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 27, juvenile

Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-27 (ALS27) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by early childhood-onset lower extremity spasticity manifesting as toe walking and gait abnormalities, followed by progressive lower motor neuron-mediated weakness without sensory signs or symptoms (Mohassel et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, see ALS1 (105400). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1840995
Concept ID:
C5830359
Disease or Syndrome
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