U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 14

1.

Autosomal recessive inherited pseudoxanthoma elasticum

Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a systemic disorder that affects the elastic tissue of the skin, the eye, and vascular system. Individuals most commonly present with angioid streaks of the retina found on routine eye examination or associated with retinal hemorrhage and/or characteristic papules in the skin. The most frequent cause of morbidity and disability in PXE is reduced vision due to complications of subretinal neovascularizations and macular atrophy. Other manifestations include premature gastrointestinal angina and/or bleeding, intermittent claudication of arm and leg muscles, stroke, renovascular hypertension, and cardiovascular complications (angina/myocardial infarction). Most affected individuals live a normal life span. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
698415
Concept ID:
C1275116
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Desmin-related myofibrillar myopathy

Myofibrillar myopathy (MFM) is a noncommittal term that refers to a group of morphologically homogeneous, but genetically heterogeneous chronic neuromuscular disorders. The morphologic changes in skeletal muscle in MFM result from disintegration of the sarcomeric Z disc and the myofibrils, followed by abnormal ectopic accumulation of multiple proteins involved in the structure of the Z disc, including desmin, alpha-B-crystallin (CRYAB; 123590), dystrophin (300377), and myotilin (TTID; 604103). Genetic Heterogeneity of Myofibrillar Myopathy Other forms of MFM include MFM2 (608810), caused by mutation in the CRYAB gene (123590); MFM3 (609200), caused by mutation in the MYOT gene (604103); MFM4 (609452), caused by mutation in the ZASP gene (LDB3; 605906); MFM5 (609524), caused by mutation in the FLNC gene (102565); MFM6 (612954), caused by mutation in the BAG3 gene (603883); MFM7 (617114), caused by mutation in the KY gene (605739); MFM8 (617258), caused by mutation in the PYROXD1 gene (617220); MFM9 (603689), caused by mutation in the TTN gene (188840); MFM10 (619040), caused by mutation in the SVIL UNC45B gene (611220); MFM11 (619178), caused by mutation in the UNC45B gene (611220); and MFM12 (619424), caused by mutation in the MYL2 gene (160781). 'Desmin-related myopathy' is another term referring to MFM in which there are intrasarcoplasmic aggregates of desmin, usually in addition to other sarcomeric proteins. Rigid spine syndrome (602771), caused by mutation in the SEPN1 gene (606210), is another desmin-related myopathy. Goebel (1995) provided a review of desmin-related myopathy. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
330449
Concept ID:
C1832370
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Dilated cardiomyopathy 1R

Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ACTC1 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
462031
Concept ID:
C3150681
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 8

Any hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MYL3 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
324806
Concept ID:
C1837471
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Cardiomyopathy, familial restrictive, 1

Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a myocardial disease characterized by impaired ventricular filling and reduced diastolic volume in the presence of normal systolic function and normal or near-normal myocardial thickness. The disease is characterized by symptoms of progressive left- and right-sided heart failure. The overall prognosis is poor, especially when onset is in childhood, and patients often require cardiac transplantation (Mogensen et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Restrictive Cardiomyopathy Other forms of familial restrictive cardiomyopathy include RCM2 (609578), mapped to chromosome 10q23; RCM3 (612422), caused by mutation in the TNNT2 gene (191045) on chromosome 1q32; RCM4 (see 615248), caused by mutation in the MYPN gene (608517) on chromosome 10q21; RCM5 (see 617047), caused by mutation in the FLNC gene (102565) on chromosome 7q32; and RCM6 (619433), caused by mutation in the KIF20A gene (605664) on chromosome 5q31. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
396236
Concept ID:
C1861861
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Myofibrillar myopathy 6

Myofibrillar myopathy-6 is an autosomal dominant severe neuromuscular disorder characterized by onset in the first decade of rapidly progressive generalized and proximal muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, cardiomyopathy, and skeletal deformities related to muscle weakness. Muscle biopsy shows fiber-type grouping, disruption of the Z lines, and filamentous inclusions, and sural nerve biopsy shows a neuropathy, often with giant axonal neurons. Most patients are severely affected by the second decade and need cardiac transplant, ventilation, and/or a wheelchair (summary by Jaffer et al., 2012). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy (MFM), see MFM1 (601419). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
414119
Concept ID:
C2751831
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Cardiomyopathy, familial restrictive, 3

Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. For the heart to beat normally, the heart (cardiac) muscle must contract and relax in a coordinated way. Oxygen-rich blood from the lungs travels first through the upper chambers of the heart (the atria), and then to the lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles).

Adults with familial restrictive cardiomyopathy typically first develop shortness of breath, fatigue, and a reduced ability to exercise. Some individuals have an irregular heart beat (arrhythmia) and may also experience a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations) and dizziness. Abnormal blood clots are commonly seen in adults with this condition. Without treatment, approximately one-third of adults with familial restrictive cardiomyopathy do not survive more than five years after diagnosis.

In people with familial restrictive cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle is stiff and cannot fully relax after each contraction. Impaired muscle relaxation causes blood to back up in the atria and lungs, which reduces the amount of blood in the ventricles.

Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy can appear anytime from childhood to adulthood. The first signs and symptoms of this condition in children are failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive), extreme tiredness (fatigue), and fainting. Children who are severely affected may also have abnormal swelling or puffiness (edema), increased blood pressure, an enlarged liver, an abnormal buildup of fluid in the abdominal cavity (ascites), and lung congestion. Some children with familial restrictive cardiomyopathy do not have any obvious signs or symptoms, but they may die suddenly due to heart failure. Without treatment, the majority of affected children survive only a few years after they are diagnosed. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
382807
Concept ID:
C2676271
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 3

Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, lack of psychomotor development, seizures, dysmorphic features, and variable congenital anomalies involving the cardiac, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems. Most affected individuals die before 3 years of age (summary by Maydan et al., 2011). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MCAHS, see MCAHS1 (614080). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
815686
Concept ID:
C3809356
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome

PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia is a form of blood cell cancer characterized by an elevated number of cells called eosinophils in the blood. These cells help fight infections by certain parasites and are involved in the inflammation associated with allergic reactions. However, these circumstances do not account for the increased number of eosinophils in PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia.

Another characteristic feature of PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia is organ damage caused by the excess eosinophils. Eosinophils release substances to aid in the immune response, but the release of excessive amounts of these substances causes damage to one or more organs, most commonly the heart, skin, lungs, or nervous system. Eosinophil-associated organ damage can lead to a heart condition known as eosinophilic endomyocardial disease, skin rashes, coughing, difficulty breathing, swelling (edema) in the lower limbs, confusion, changes in behavior, or impaired movement or sensations. People with PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia can also have an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) and elevated levels of certain chemicals called vitamin B12 and tryptase in the blood.

Some people with PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia have an increased number of other types of white blood cells, such as neutrophils or mast cells. Occasionally, people with PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia develop other blood cell cancers, such as acute myeloid leukemia or B-cell or T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.

PDGFRA-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia is often grouped with a related condition called hypereosinophilic syndrome. These two conditions have very similar signs and symptoms; however, the cause of hypereosinophilic syndrome is unknown. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
61525
Concept ID:
C0206141
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Microcephaly 13, primary, autosomal recessive

Any autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CENPE gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
863517
Concept ID:
C4015080
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Myopathy, myofibrillar, 12, infantile-onset, with cardiomyopathy

Infantile-onset myofibrillar myopathy-12 with cardiomyopathy (MFM12) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder affecting both skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue that is apparent in the first weeks of life. Affected infants show tremor or clonus at birth, followed by onset of rapidly progressive generalized muscle weakness and dilated cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure, usually resulting in death by 6 months of age. Skeletal and cardiac muscle tissues show hypotrophy of type I muscle fibers and evidence of myofibrillar disorganization (summary by Weterman et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1794147
Concept ID:
C5561937
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Immunodeficiency 80 with or without congenital cardiomyopathy

Immunodeficiency-80 with or without congenital cardiomyopathy (IMD80) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder with variable manifestations. One patient with infantile-onset of chronic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection associated with severely decreased NK cells has been reported. Another family with 3 affected fetuses showing restrictive cardiomyopathy and hypoplasia of the spleen and thymus has also been reported (summary by Baxley et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1786417
Concept ID:
C5543344
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Cardiomyopathy, familial restrictive, 6

Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy-6 (RCM6) is characterized by prenatal onset of severe restrictive cardiomyopathy predominantly involving the right ventricle, resulting in irreversible heart failure and early death (Louw et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial restrictive cardiomyopathy, see RCM1 (115210). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1780781
Concept ID:
C5543638
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Restrictive cardiomyopathy

Restrictive left ventricular physiology is characterized by a pattern of ventricular filling in which increased stiffness of the myocardium causes ventricular pressure to rise precipitously with only small increases in volume, defined as restrictive ventricular physiology in the presence of normal or reduced diastolic volumes (of one or both ventricles), normal or reduced systolic volumes, and normal ventricular wall thickness. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
40111
Concept ID:
C0007196
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity