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1.

Brugada syndrome 1

Brugada syndrome is characterized by cardiac conduction abnormalities (ST segment abnormalities in leads V1-V3 on EKG and a high risk for ventricular arrhythmias) that can result in sudden death. Brugada syndrome presents primarily during adulthood, although age at diagnosis may range from infancy to late adulthood. The mean age of sudden death is approximately 40 years. Clinical presentations may also include sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS; death of a child during the first year of life without an identifiable cause) and sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS), a typical presentation in individuals from Southeast Asia. Other conduction defects can include first-degree AV block, intraventricular conduction delay, right bundle branch block, and sick sinus syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1646402
Concept ID:
C4551804
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 4

While most people with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are symptom-free or have only mild symptoms, this condition can have serious consequences. It can cause abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) that may be life threatening. People with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have an increased risk of sudden death, even if they have no other symptoms of the condition. A small number of affected individuals develop potentially fatal heart failure, which may require heart transplantation.

The symptoms of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are variable, even within the same family. Many affected individuals have no symptoms. Other people with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may experience chest pain; shortness of breath, especially with physical exertion; a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations); lightheadedness; dizziness; and fainting.

Nonfamilial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy tends to be milder. This form typically begins later in life than familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and affected individuals have a lower risk of serious cardiac events and sudden death than people with the familial form.

In familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cardiac thickening usually occurs in the interventricular septum, which is the muscular wall that separates the lower left chamber of the heart (the left ventricle) from the lower right chamber (the right ventricle). In some people, thickening of the interventricular septum impedes the flow of oxygen-rich blood from the heart, which may lead to an abnormal heart sound during a heartbeat (heart murmur) and other signs and symptoms of the condition. Other affected individuals do not have physical obstruction of blood flow, but the pumping of blood is less efficient, which can also lead to symptoms of the condition. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy often begins in adolescence or young adulthood, although it can develop at any time throughout life.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a heart condition characterized by thickening (hypertrophy) of the heart (cardiac) muscle. When multiple members of a family have the condition, it is known as familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also occurs in people with no family history; these cases are considered nonfamilial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.  [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
350526
Concept ID:
C1861862
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Dilated cardiomyopathy 1E

Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the SCN5A gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
331341
Concept ID:
C1832680
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 11

An autosomal dominant subtype of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutation(s) in the ACTC1 gene, encoding actin, alpha cardiac muscle 1. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
436962
Concept ID:
C2677506
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 2

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a heart condition characterized by thickening (hypertrophy) of the heart (cardiac) muscle. When multiple members of a family have the condition, it is known as familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also occurs in people with no family history; these cases are considered nonfamilial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. 

In familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cardiac thickening usually occurs in the interventricular septum, which is the muscular wall that separates the lower left chamber of the heart (the left ventricle) from the lower right chamber (the right ventricle). In some people, thickening of the interventricular septum impedes the flow of oxygen-rich blood from the heart, which may lead to an abnormal heart sound during a heartbeat (heart murmur) and other signs and symptoms of the condition. Other affected individuals do not have physical obstruction of blood flow, but the pumping of blood is less efficient, which can also lead to symptoms of the condition. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy often begins in adolescence or young adulthood, although it can develop at any time throughout life.

Nonfamilial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy tends to be milder. This form typically begins later in life than familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and affected individuals have a lower risk of serious cardiac events and sudden death than people with the familial form.

The symptoms of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are variable, even within the same family. Many affected individuals have no symptoms. Other people with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may experience chest pain; shortness of breath, especially with physical exertion; a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations); lightheadedness; dizziness; and fainting.

While most people with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are symptom-free or have only mild symptoms, this condition can have serious consequences. It can cause abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) that may be life threatening. People with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have an increased risk of sudden death, even if they have no other symptoms of the condition. A small number of affected individuals develop potentially fatal heart failure, which may require heart transplantation. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
349383
Concept ID:
C1861864
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Progressive familial heart block, type 1A

Progressive familial heart block type I (PFHBI, PFHB1) is an autosomal dominant cardiac bundle branch disorder that may progress to complete heart block (Brink and Torrington, 1977; van der Merwe et al., 1986; van der Merwe et al., 1988). It is defined on electrocardiogram by evidence of bundle branch disease, i.e., right bundle branch block, left anterior or posterior hemiblock, or complete heart block, with broad QRS complexes. Progression has been shown from a normal electrocardiogram to right bundle branch block and from the latter to complete heart block. These electrocardiographic features differentiate PFHB type I from progressive familial heart block type II (PFHBII, PFHB2; 140400), in which the onset of complete heart block is associated with narrow complexes. Electrocardiographically the changes represent, respectively, bundle branch disease (PFHB1) and atrioventricular nodal disease with an atrioventricular block and an idionodal escape rhythm (PFHB2). PFHBI is manifested symptomatically when complete heart block supervenes, either with dyspnea, syncopal episodes, or sudden death. Treatment, which is best managed by regular electrocardiographic follow-up, is by the timely implantation of a pacemaker (Brink et al., 1995). Genetic Heterogeneity of Progressive Familial Heart Block Type I Progressive familial heart block type IB (PFHB1B; 604559) is caused by mutation in the TRPM4 gene (606936) on chromosome 19q13.32. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
406301
Concept ID:
C1879286
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Brugada syndrome 8

Brugada syndrome is characterized by cardiac conduction abnormalities (ST segment abnormalities in leads V1-V3 on EKG and a high risk for ventricular arrhythmias) that can result in sudden death. Brugada syndrome presents primarily during adulthood, although age at diagnosis may range from infancy to late adulthood. The mean age of sudden death is approximately 40 years. Clinical presentations may also include sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS; death of a child during the first year of life without an identifiable cause) and sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS), a typical presentation in individuals from Southeast Asia. Other conduction defects can include first-degree AV block, intraventricular conduction delay, right bundle branch block, and sick sinus syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
413928
Concept ID:
C2751083
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 10

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
347543
Concept ID:
C1857777
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Brugada syndrome 2

Brugada syndrome is characterized by cardiac conduction abnormalities (ST segment abnormalities in leads V1-V3 on EKG and a high risk for ventricular arrhythmias) that can result in sudden death. Brugada syndrome presents primarily during adulthood, although age at diagnosis may range from infancy to late adulthood. The mean age of sudden death is approximately 40 years. Clinical presentations may also include sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS; death of a child during the first year of life without an identifiable cause) and sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS), a typical presentation in individuals from Southeast Asia. Other conduction defects can include first-degree AV block, intraventricular conduction delay, right bundle branch block, and sick sinus syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
382031
Concept ID:
C2673193
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 13

Any hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the TNNC1 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
442487
Concept ID:
C2750472
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Naxos disease

Naxos disease (NXD) is characterized by arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy associated with abnormalities of the skin, hair, and nails. The ectodermal features are evident from birth or early childhood, whereas the cardiac symptoms develop in young adulthood or later. Clinical variability of ectodermal features has been observed, with hair anomalies ranging from woolly hair to alopecia, and skin abnormalities ranging from mild focal palmoplantar keratoderma to generalized skin fragility or even lethal neonatal epidermolysis bullosa (Protonotarios et al., 1986; Cabral et al., 2010; Pigors et al., 2011; Erken et al., 2011; Sen-Chowdhry and McKenna, 2014). Another syndrome involving cardiomyopathy, woolly hair, and keratoderma (DCWHK; 605676) is caused by mutation in the desmoplakin gene (DSP; 125647). Also see 610476 for a similar disorder caused by homozygous mutation in the DSC2 gene (125645). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
321991
Concept ID:
C1832600
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Myotonic dystrophy type 2

Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is characterized by myotonia and muscle dysfunction (proximal and axial weakness, myalgia, and stiffness), and less commonly by posterior subcapsular cataracts, cardiac conduction defects, insulin-insensitive type 2 diabetes mellitus, and other endocrine abnormalities. While myotonia (involuntary muscle contraction with delayed relaxation) has been reported during the first decade, onset is typically in the third to fourth decade, most commonly with fluctuating or episodic muscle pain that can be debilitating and proximal and axial weakness of the neck flexors and the hip flexors. Subsequently, weakness occurs in the elbow extensors and finger flexors. Facial weakness and weakness of the ankle dorsiflexors are less common. Myotonia rarely causes severe symptoms. In a subset of individuals, calf hypertrophy in combination with brisk reflexes is notable. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
419137
Concept ID:
C2931689
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Myopathy, myosin storage, autosomal recessive

Autosomal recessive myosin storage congenital myopathy-7B (CMYP7B) is a skeletal muscle disorder characterized by the onset of scapuloperoneal muscle weakness in early childhood or young adulthood. Affected individuals have difficulty walking, steppage gait, and scapular winging due to shoulder girdle involvement. The severity and progression of the disorder is highly variable, even within families. Most patients develop respiratory insufficiency, nocturnal hypoventilation, and restrictive lung disease; some develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Additional features include myopathic facies, high-arched palate, scoliosis, and muscle wasting with thin body habitus. Serum creatine kinase may be normal or elevated. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows variable findings, including myosin storage disease, type 1 fiber predominance, centralized nuclei, and multiminicore disease (Onengut et al., 2004; Tajsharghi et al., 2007; Beecroft et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
340603
Concept ID:
C1850709
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 14

An autosomal dominant subtype of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutation(s) in the MYH6 gene, encoding myosin-6. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
442484
Concept ID:
C2750467
Disease or Syndrome
15.

X-linked scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy

A rare, genetic, muscular dystrophy disease characterized by the co-occurrence of late onset scapular and peroneal muscle weakness, principally manifesting with distal lower limb and proximal upper limb weakness and scapular winging. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
395530
Concept ID:
C2678061
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2N

MDDGC2 is an autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy with onset after ambulation is achieved. Cognition is normal (Biancheri et al., 2007). It is part of a group of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
461768
Concept ID:
C3150418
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Glycogen storage disease XV

Glycogen storage disease type 15 is an extremely rare genetic glycogen storage disease reported in one patient to date. Clinical signs included muscle weakness, cardiac arrhythmia associated with accumulation of abnormal storage material in the heart and glycogen depletion in skeletal muscle. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
462104
Concept ID:
C3150754
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Pulmonary hypertension, primary, 4

Primary pulmonary hypertension is a rare progressive disease characterized by increased pulmonary artery pressure in the absence of common causes of pulmonary hypertension, such as chronic heart, lung, or thromboembolic disease. There is often vascular remodeling. The clinical presentation can be nonspecific, and patients often receive a diagnosis late in their clinical course (summary by Ma et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of primary pulmonary hypertension, see PPH1 (178600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
815528
Concept ID:
C3809198
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Progressive familial heart block type IB

Most cases of heart block are not genetic and are not considered progressive familial heart block. The most common cause of heart block is fibrosis of the heart, which occurs as a normal process of aging. Other causes of heart block can include the use of certain medications or an infection of the heart tissue.

Progressive familial heart block can be divided into type I and type II, with type I being further divided into types IA and IB. These types differ in where in the heart signaling is interrupted and the genetic cause. In types IA and IB, the heart block originates in the bundle branch, and in type II, the heart block originates in the atrioventricular node. The different types of progressive familial heart block have similar signs and symptoms.

Heart block occurs when the electrical signaling is obstructed anywhere from the atria to the ventricles. In people with progressive familial heart block, the condition worsens over time: early in the disorder, the electrical signals are partially blocked, but the block eventually becomes complete, preventing any signals from passing through the heart. Partial heart block causes a slow or irregular heartbeat (bradycardia or arrhythmia, respectively), and can lead to the buildup of scar tissue (fibrosis) in the cells that carry electrical impulses. Fibrosis contributes to the development of complete heart block, resulting in uncoordinated electrical signaling between the atria and the ventricles and inefficient pumping of blood in the heart. Complete heart block can cause a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations), shortness of breath, fainting (syncope), or sudden cardiac arrest and death.

Progressive familial heart block is a genetic condition that alters the normal beating of the heart. A normal heartbeat is controlled by electrical signals that move through the heart in a highly coordinated way. These signals begin in a specialized cluster of cells called the sinoatrial node (the heart's natural pacemaker) located in the heart's upper chambers (the atria). From there, a group of cells called the atrioventricular node carries the electrical signals to another cluster of cells called the bundle of His. This bundle separates into multiple thin spindles called bundle branches, which carry electrical signals into the heart's lower chambers (the ventricles). Electrical impulses move from the sinoatrial node down to the bundle branches, stimulating a normal heartbeat in which the ventricles contract slightly later than the atria. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
370220
Concept ID:
C1970298
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair 2

An inherited condition caused by autosomal dominant mutation(s) in the PPP1CB gene, encoding serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1-beta catalytic subunit. The condition is characterized by facial features similar to those seen in Noonan syndrome but may also include short stature, cognitive deficits, relative macrocephaly, small posterior fossa resulting in Chiari I malformation, hypernasal voice, cardiac defects, and ectodermal abnormalities, which typically presents as slow-growing, sparse, and/or unruly hair. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
1376945
Concept ID:
C4479577
Disease or Syndrome
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